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Table VI. Showing the Value of an Annuity on one Life according to the Probabilities

of Life in London.

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11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40

19.0 18.9 18.7 185 18.3 18.1 17.9 17.6 174 17.2 17.0 16.8 16.5 16:3 16:1 15.9 15-6 15.4 15.2 150 14.8 14.6 14.4 14.2 14:1 13.9 13.7 13.5 13.3 13-2

16.4 16:3 16-2 16.0 15.8 15-6 15.4 15.2 150 14.8 14.7 14.5 14.8 14:1 14.0 13.8 13.6 13.4 13.2 19:1 12.9 12.7 12.6 12.4 12:3 12.1 11.9 11.8 11.6 11.5

14:3
14.2
14:1
140
13.9
13.7
13.5
13.4
13.2
130
12.9
12:7
126
12.4
12.3
12:1
120
11.8
11.7
11.6
11.4
11.3
112
110
10.9
10.8
10.6
10:5
10.4
10.3

41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64

13.0 12.8 12-6 12.5 12.3 12:1 11.9 11:8 116 11.4 11.2 110 10.7 10:5 103 10.1 9.9 96 9.4 9.2 8.9 87 8.5 8.3 80 7.8 76 7.4 7.1 6.9 6.7 6.5 6-2 5.9 56

11.4
11.2
11.1
110
10-8
10.7
10:5
10-4
10-2
10.1
9.9
9.8
9-6
9.4
9.9
9.1
8.9
8.7
86
8.4
8.2
8:1
7.9
77
7.5
7.3
7.1
6.9
6.7
6.5
6.9
6:1
5.9
5-6
54

10-2 10:1 100 9.9 9.8 9-7 9.5 94 9.3 9.2 90 8.9 8.8 86 8.5 8.4 8.2 8:1 80 7.9 77 76 74 7.3 7:1 6.9 6.7 66 64 6.2 60 5.8 5.6 54 5.2

65 66

67 68 69 70 71 72 78 74

75

TABLE VI.a. Expectation of Life. De Moivre's Hypothesis on the duration of human life, namely, that of 86 persons born one dies every year till all are extinct, has led to an empirical rule of easy recollection for the expectation of life, namely, to subtract the age from 86 and halve the difference for an answer. In the left hand side of the subjoined table is shown the number of persons out of 10,000 who may be expected to die in the year following their attaining the age marked in the first column, according to the Hypothesis, to the Northampton and Carlisle tables, and to the Belgian one of Quetelet. The table on the right shows the values of annuities on lives at 3 per cent. in years' purchase, whence it appears that in money results the Hypothesis curiously agrees with the celebrated Northampton tables.

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Tabla VII. Sbowing the value of an Annuity on the joint Continuance of two Lives,

according to the Probabilities of Life in London.

Age of the

Value at

Age of the

Value at

Younger. Elder. 3 per cent. 4 per Cent. 5 per cent. Younger. Elder. 3 per cent. 4 per Cent. 5 per cent

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Tablı VIII. Showing the Value of an Annuity on the longer of two Lives.

Age of the

Value at

Age of the

Value at

Younger. Elder. 8 per Cent. 4 per Cent. 5 per cent. Younger. Elder. 3 per cent. 4 per Cent. 5 per Ceint

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F SYNOPTICAL LIST OF THE PRINCIPAL

ARCHITECTS,
NCIENT AND DODERN,
WITH THEIR CHIEF WORKS,

REVISED BY Wyatt PAPWORTH

he Names herein are more fully noticed in the body of this work, and me few others will be found by reference to its Index.

BEFORE CHRIST.

7th. Century. Es and TROPHONIUS of Delphi.--Mentioned only in mythology; temple ollo at Delphi; a temple to Neptune near Mantinæa. Rus and Rhacus, of Samos.- Labyrinth at Lemnos; some buildings at a; the temple of Jupiter at Samos; foundations of one of the teinples of a at Ephesus. GENES of Alabanda. — Temple of Bacchus at Teos; and that of Diana at nesia.

6th. Century. FRIUS and PæoNIUS, of Ephesus.-Continuation of one of the temples of na, at Ephesus, which had been begun by CHERSIPHRON or Ctesiphon and son Metagenes. Nis of Miletus. -. With Pæonius, temple of Apollo at Miletus. LINUS of Megara.—Tunnel for the aqueduct, and some edifices at Samos. OSOPHUS of Crete.— Temple to Ceres and Proserpine; another to the Paphian nus, and one to Apollo; all at Tegea. ROCLES of Samos.-Bridge of boats over the Thracian Bosphorus, for King rius. io of Persia.-A magnificent palace at Ecbatana for Cyrus.

51h. Century. us of Priene.-Mausoleum at Halicarnassus ; the temple of Minerva at ene, and wrote a treatise on it. In the former he was assisted by Satyrus. ARUS of Corinth.—Rebuilt the temple of Apollo at Delphi, which had a destroyed by fire. f Elis. — Temple of Jupiter Olympius at Olympia, s of Athens.- Parthenon at Athens, and wrote a treatise upon it; perhaps temple of Ceres and Proserpine at Eleusis ; temple of Apollo Epicurius

Phigaleia. RATES of Athens.-Assisted Ictinus in the erection of the Parthenon. LES of Athens.- Propylea of the Acropolis at Athens. ATES of Athens-A temple of Jupiter at Athens. of Paros.-One side of ihe Mausoleum at Halicarnassus; a column of the le at Ephesus. Employed on temple of Minerva at Tegea. A Mus of Miletus.- Laid out Munychia in the Piræus and Rhodes. is and METAGENES XYPETIUS of Athens.—Perhaps the temple of Ceres "usis, trus.—A theatre with a dome at Epidaurus, highly praised by Pausanius. s of Corivth -- Many temples and other edifices, at Syracuse.

of Aradus.- Machinery. sius and ARGELIUS.— Wrote treatises on Architecture; th: furmer is sed to havn erected the temple to Æsculapius at Tralles. Es. - Pseudodipteral temple of Apollo at Magnesia.

BEFORE CHRIST.

4th, Century xxv. DeinocRATES or DINOCHARES of Macedonia. — Rebuilt the last temple of Diana at

Ephesus; laid out the city of Alexandria, and designed many edifices there ;

proposed to transform Mount Athos into a colossal figure of Alexander, XXVI. CALLIMACHCs of Corinth.— Reputed inventor of the Corinthian order. Vitruvius,

b. iv, chap. 1. XXVII. Sostratus of Cnidus.—The Pharos near Alexandria. XXVIII. EUPOLEMUS of Argos.-Several temples and a theatre at Argos. The Heræum near Mycenæ.

3rd. Century. XXIX. Puxax of Agrigentum.- Various buildings at Agrigentum. XXX. CLEODAMAS of Byzantium.-Restored, with Athenæus, the cities destroyed by the Scythæ and others.

2nd. Century. XXXI. COSSUTIUS of Rome. - Additions to the temple of Jupiter Olympius at Athens,

tor Antiochus Epiphanus, king of Syria, and afterwards (lestroyed. XXXI. Philo of Athens or of Byzantium. – Enlarged the arsenal and the Piræus at

Athens; erected the great theatre, rebuilt by order of Hadrian. Wrote in

Architecture. XXXII. HERMODORUS of Salamis.- Temple of Jupiter Stator in the Forum, and temple

of Mars in the Circus Flaminius, at Rome. XXXIV. Carus Mutius of Rome.-Temples to Honour and Virtue near the trophies of Marius at Rome.

1st. Century. XXXV. BATRACHUS and SAURUS, of Laconia.—These two architects built the temple and enclosed by the portico of Octavia, at Rome. The name of the first (Bar paxos)

signifies a frog; and that of the latter (oavpos), a lizard. They are considered to have perpetuated their names by the representation of those animals in the eye of the volutes of the lonic order, of which a capital has been found ; and in the churches of St. Eusebius and of St. Lorenzo fuori le Mura, at

Rome, are pedestals sculptured with them.
XXXVII, DexiPHANES of Cyprus, or Cnidos.-A causeway; and rebuilt or repaired the

Pharos at Alexandria, erected by Sostratus.
XXXVIII. VALERIUS of Ostiuin.-Covered in a theatre at Rome,
XXXIX. Cyrus of Rome.-Architect to Cicero and his brother.

XL. PosthumIUS of Rome.—Many works at Rome and Naples.
XLI. Lucius CoccEJUS Auctus of Rome.-Grotta della Sibella from Lacus Avernus to

Baiæ; a temple at Pozzuoli; tunnel of Cumæ, near the Lacus Avernus.
XIII. Fussitius or Furitius of Rome.-Several buildings at Rome. The first Roman

who wrote copiously on architecture. XLIII. MESSIDIUS and PhiloXENUS.—Formed an aqueduct near Rome for Cicero's

brother. ILIV, NUMISIUS.—Theatre at Herculaneum ; buried A.D. 79.

XXXVI.

AFTER CHRIST.

1st. Century. 1. Marcus VITRUVIUS Pollio of Fano.- Basilica Justitiæ at Fano. Writer on architec

ture, the oldest work extant on the art. 2. VITRUVIUS Cerdo of Verona. — Triumphal arch at Verona. 3. Celer of Rome.—Golden house of Nero, with SEVERUS of Rome. 4. Rabirius of Rome.-- Palace of Domitian and works connected therewith, on Mvunt

Palatine. 5. Mustius of Rome.— Temple to Ceres at Rome.

2nd. Century. 6. Julius FRONTINUS of Rome.-He has left a work on aqueducts. 7. APOLLODORUS of Damascus. — The forum of Trajan, the column of Trajan, and other

buildings at Rome; a stone bridge over the Danube in Lower Hungary, the remains of which are still viible.

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