Literary Anecdotes of the Eighteenth Century: Comprizing Biographical Memoirs of William Bowyer, Printer, F.S.A., and Many of His Learned Friends; an Incidental View of the Progress and Advancement of Literature in this Kingdom During the Last Century; and Biographical Anecdotes of a Considerable Number of Eminent Writers and Ingenious Artists; with a Very Copious Index, Volume 1

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Page 358 - Alvan, and Manahath, and Ebal, Shepho, and Onam. 24 And these are the children of Zibeon; both Ajah, and Anah: this was that Anah that found the mules in the wilderness, as he fed the asses of Zibeon his father.
Page 180 - ADVENTURES OF ROBINSON CRUSOE , Of YORK. MARINER: Who lived Eight and Twenty Years, all alone in an un-inhabited Island on the Coast of AMERICA, near the Mouth of the Great River of OROONOQUE; Having been cast on Shore by Shipwreck, wherein all the Men perished but himself. WITH An Account how he was at last as strangely deliver'd by PYRATES. Written by Himself.
Page 293 - I expect fifty pounds in good silver; not such as I have had formerly. I am not obliged to take gold*, neither will I; nor stay for it beyond four and twenty hours after it is due.
Page 342 - I shall say the less of Mr Collier, because in many things he has taxed me justly; and I have pleaded guilty to all thoughts and expressions of mine which can be truly argued of obscenity, profaneness, or immorality, and retract them. If he be my enemy, let him triumph ; if he be my friend, as I have given him no personal occasion to be otherwise, he will be glad of my repentance.
Page 400 - if the courtiers give me a watch that won't go right?' Then he instructed a young nobleman that the best poet in England was Mr. Pope (a Papist), who had begun a translation of Homer into English verse, for which, he said, he must have them all subscribe. 'For,' says he, 'the author shall not begin to print till I have a thousand guineas for him.
Page 669 - Landbeach to one of bis sons-in-law, the rev. TC Burroughs, but continued to reside there. He was in the commission of the peace for the county of Cambridge. He died at Landbeach July 5, 1798, in his eightythird year. As a divine he published only one sermon, " The Mischiefs of faction and rebellion considered," preached at Cambridge in 1745.
Page v - To adjust the minute events of literary history, is tedious and troublesome ; it requires indeed no great force of understanding, but often depends upon enquiries which there is no opportunity of making, or is to be fetched from books and pamphlets not always at hand.
Page 160 - Jus ACADEMICUM ; or, a Defence of the peculiar Jurisdiction which belongs of common right to UNIVERSITIES in general, and hath been granted by Royal Charters, confirmed in Parliament, to those of ENGLAND in particular. Shewing, that no Prohibition can lie against their Courts of Judicature, nor appeal from them, in any Cause like that which is now depending before the Vice-chancellor of Cambridge. With a Full Account and Vindication of the Proceedings in that Cause. By a Person concerned. '•London....
Page 526 - Arcadia, and imputing it to the king ; whom he charges, in his Iconoclastes, with the use of this prayer, as with a heavy crime, in the indecent language with which prosperity had emboldened the advocates for rebellion to insult all that is venerable or great : " Who would have imagined so little fear in him of the true all-seeing Deity...
Page 293 - Miscellany for fifty guineas, when he had calculated at the rate of 1518 lines for forty guineas ; he gives the poet a piece of critical reasoning, that he considered he had a better bargain with "Juvenal," which is reckoned "not so easy to translate as Ovid.

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