Letters of the Wordsworth Family from 1787 to 1855: 1812-1832

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Contents

1815
48
The new edition of Poems Beattie contrasted
52
Opinions on The Excursion from James Mont
55
An obituary notice for Mr Luff of Patterdale
62
WILLIAM WORDSWORTH TO FRANCIS WRANGHAM
67
Your Paris Revisited in constant use character
69
Invites criticism upon MSS Henry Brougham
76
WILLIAM WORDSWORTH TO ROBERT SOUTHEY
83
A gloomy outlook on public affairs the education
89
A visit from Mr Cargill traveling directions
90
Death of Thomas Wordsworth I 2
96
Dr Chalmers Furness Abbey Southeys letter
104
1818
110
King and constitution in preference to church
111
1819
117
Further reference to the translation of the Æneid
123
Rogers Human Life Blackwoods Magazine
124
820
130
A note to Miss Rogers my nephew William
136
A game at speculation Christopher and Charles
140
WILLIAM WORDSWORTH TO VISCOUNT LOWTHER
147
WILLIAM WORDSWORTH TO FRANCIS CHANTREY
157
The modification of his views on the subject
162
The Lambs Coleridges article in Blackwoods
166
1822
168
A criticism of Peveril by a descendant of one of
172
Recommending T Hutchinson as a land agent
177
Mr Monkhouse the Memorials a review in
181
Chantreys bust C s writings
184
Desires further account of R s travels
192
Acknowledging a present of a cask of sugar
197
MARY WORDSWORTH TO EDWARD QUILLINAN
203
Byrons indebtedness to other poets
212
A three weeks ramble in North Wales with
220
WILLIAM WORDSWORTH TO ALARIC WATTS
227
MARY WORDSWORTH TO LADY BEAUMONT
232
To thank you for your admirable Dialogues
235
1825
240
Authors above booksellers Murray and Long
246
The Memorials and Ecclesiastical Sketches
247
An unusual event a letter from Coleridge Sara
254
WILLIAM WORDSWORTH TO ALARIC WATTS
264
Rumors of being obliged to quit Rydal Mount
275
An invitation to Brinsop Court a postscript to
318
WILLIAM TO MARY AND DORA WORDSWORTH
319
A visit to Cambridge 239
324
Regarding contributions to public journals
325
Desires a letter of chitchat her hopes
332
Views on the subject of education
337
WILLIAM WORDSWORTH TO F MANSEL REYNOLDS
349
His tour on the Rhine and in the Netherlands
355
Reply to a request for verses The Malvern
360
More work and less pay
365
WILLIAM WORDSWORTH TO AN ENGLISH PRELATE
366
A visit to Borrowdale with William and Mrs Luff
371
Interest in R s journey to the Pyrenees
374
WILLIAM WORDSWORTH TO GEORGE HUNTLY GORDON
383
WILLIAM WORDSWORTH TO HENRY ROBINSON
386
A trip to Killarney
389
A history of our proceedings since you left
394
Criticism of verses of Sir W and Miss Hamilton
397
WILLIAM WORDSWORTH TO FRANCIS BEAUFORT
401
DII One point of prime importance in this crisis
407
Conveying thanks for books and commending M s edi
408
Positive instruction much overrated the education
417
Mr Coleridges new work The Hedgehog
425
A few additional words on British poetesses
426
WILLIAM WORDSWORTH TO EDWARD MOXON
432
An invitation a message to Mr Edgeworth
434
We should be glad to see you at any time
435
1831
443
A sonnet piping hot from the brain a caricature
447
His aversion to appearing in periodicals
450
Wilkins portrait of Wordsworth a visit to Belle
453
Guide to the Lakes 175
455
Son of the artist
459
Her tour in the Highlands Wordsworth depressed
464
Hopes for a visit from R the dreadful results
471
A list of errata Hines Selections
478
Opinion on Lord Hollands proposal for compromise
485
His translation from the Æneid
494
A copy of The Souvenir for 1832 a sonnet
496
WILLIAM WORDSWORTH TO THOMAS ARNOLD
502
Advice as to travel on the continent
509
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Page 154 - I should think that I had lived to little purpose if my notions on the subject of government had undergone no modification : my youth must, in that / case, have been without enthusiasm, and my manhood endued with small capability of profiting by reflection.
Page 249 - Theologians may puzzle their heads about dogmas as they will; the Religion of gratitude cannot mislead us. Of that we are sure; and Gratitude is the handmaid to Hope, and hope the harbinger of Faith. I look abroad upon Nature, I think of the best part of our species, I lean upon my Friends, and I meditate upon the Scriptures, especially the Gospel of St John; and my creed rises up of itself with the ease of an exhalation, yet a Fabric of adamant.
Page 39 - This poem rests entirely upon two recollections of childhood; one that of a splendour in the objects of sense which is passed away; and the other an indisposition to bend to the law of death, as applying to our own particular case. A reader who has not a vivid recollection of these feelings having existed in his mind in childhood cannot understand that poem.
Page 112 - O light of Trojans, and support of Troy, Thy father's champion, and thy country's joy! O, long expected by thy friends! from whence Art thou so late return'd for our defence ? Do we behold thee, wearied as we are With length of labours, and with toils of war? After so many funerals of thy own, Art thou restored to thy declining town? But say, what wounds are these? what new disgrace Deforms the manly features of thy face...
Page 35 - ... and shoulders. Or do you simply mean, that such thoughts as arise in the process of composition, should be expressed in the first words that offer themselves, as being likely to be most energetic and natural ? If so, this is not a rule to be followed without cautious exceptions. My first expressions I often find detestable; and it is frequently true of second words, as of. second thoughts, that they are the best.
Page 417 - ... century. Yet her style in rhyme is often admirable, chaste, tender, and vigorous, and entirely free from sparkle, antithesis, and that overculture, which reminds one, by its broad glare, its stiffness, and heaviness, of the double daisies of the garden, compared with their modest and sensitive kindred of the fields. Perhaps I am mistaken, but I think there is a good deal of resemblance in her style and versification to that of Tickell, to whom Dr. Johnson justly assigns a high place among the...
Page 446 - IN these fair vales hath many a Tree At Wordsworth's suit been spared ; And from the builder's hand this Stone, For some rude beauty of its own, Was rescued by the Bard : So let it rest ; and time will come When here the tender-hearted May heave a gentle sigh for him, As one of the departed.
Page 333 - I cannot but think, that the like would happen with our modern pupils, if the views of the patrons of these schools were realised. The diet they offer is not the natural diet for infant and juvenile minds. The faculties are over-strained, and not exercised with that simultaneous operation which ought to be aimed at as far as is practicable. Natural history is taught in infant schools by pictures stuck up against walls, and such mummery. A moment's notice of a red-breast pecking by a winter's hearth...
Page 155 - I disapproved of the war against France at its commencement, thinking, which was, perhaps, an error, that it might have been avoided ; but after Buonaparte had violated the independence of Switzerland, my heart turned against him, and against the nation that could submit to be the instrument of such an outrage. Here it was that I parted, in feeling, from the Whigs, and to a certain degree united with their adversaries, who were free from the delusion (such I must ever regard it) of Mr. Fox and his...

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