Travels in Various Countries of Europe, Asia and Africa: Greece, Egypt, and the Holy Land

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T. Cadell and W. Davies in the Strand, 1818
 

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Page 50 - And after he had seen the vision, immediately we endeavoured to go into Macedonia, assuredly gathering that the Lord had called us for to preach the gospel unto them.
Page 46 - And when they had laid many stripes upon them, they cast them into prison, charging the jailer to keep them safely; who, having received such a charge, thrust them into the inner prison and made their feet fast in the stocks.
Page 417 - And Miriam the prophetess, the sister of Aaron, took a timbrel in her hand ; and all the women went out after her with timbrels and with dances. And Miriam answered them, Sing ye to the LORD, for he hath triumphed gloriously ; the horse and his rider hath he thrown into the sea.
Page 46 - And suddenly there was a great earthquake, so that the foundations of the prison were shaken ; and immediately all the doors were opened, and every one's bands were loosed.
Page 50 - Therefore, loosing from Troas, we came, with a straight course, to Samothracia, and the next day, to Neapolis ; and from thence, to Philippi, which is the chief city of that part of Macedonia, and a colony : and we were in that city abiding certain days.
Page 433 - No wonder, such celestial charms For nine long years have set the world in arms! What winning graces! what majestic mien! She moves a Goddess, and she looks a Queen. Yet hence, oh Heav'n! convey that fatal face, And from destruction save the Trojan race.
Page 289 - Tableau de 1'Angleterre" asserts that "an Englishman may be discovered anywhere, if he be observed at table, because he places his fork upon the left side of his plate; a Frenchman, by using the fork alone without the knife; and a German, by planting it perpendicularly into his plate; and a Russian, by using it as a toothpick.
Page 114 - ... to cleanliness in their frequent ablutions; and many other of their characteristics, which forcibly contrast them with their neighbours ; — and we shall be constrained to allow that there can hardly be found a people, without the pale of Christianity, better disposed towards its most essential precepts. That they have qualities which least deserve our approbation ; and that these are the most predominant, must be attributed entirely to the want of that
Page 107 - Indeed, some of the representations of Mercury upon antient vases, are actually taken from the scenic exhibitions of the Grecian theatre; and that these exhibitions were also the prototypes of the modern pantomime, requires no other confirmation than a reference to one of them.... where Mercury, Momus, and Psyche, are delineated exactly as we see Harlequin, the Clown, and Columbine, upon the English stage.

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