Theatrum Majorum: The Cambridge of 1776, Wherein is Set Forth an Account of the Town, and of the Events it Witnessed : with which is Incorporated the Diary of Dorothy Dudley, Now First Publish'd : Together with an Historicall Sketch, Severall Appropriate Poems, Numerous Anecdotes

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Arthur Gilman
Lockwood, Brooks, 1876 - 123 pages
 

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Page 66 - Meanwhile, impatient to mount and ride, Booted and spurred, with a heavy stride On the opposite shore walked Paul Revere. Now he patted his horse's side...
Page 57 - LORD, when thy hand is lifted up, they will not see: but they shall see, and be ashamed for their envy at the people; yea, the fire of thine enemies shall devour them.
Page 88 - The second * day of July, 1776, will be the most memorable epocha in the history of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival. It ought to' be commemorated as the day of deliverance, by solemn acts of devotion to God Almighty. It ought to be solemnized with pomp and parade, with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires, and illuminations, from one end of this continent to the other, from this time forward forevermore.
Page 27 - Divine favour towards us, that his Providence would not permit us to be called into this severe controversy, until we were grown up to our present strength, had been previously exercised in warlike operation, and possessed of the means of defending ourselves.
Page 49 - Most heartily we beseech thee with thy favour to behold our most gracious Sovereign Lord, King GEORGE ; and so replenish him with the grace of thy Holy Spirit, that he may alway incline to thy will, and walk in thy way...
Page 66 - He springs to the saddle, the bridle he turns, But lingers and gazes, till full on his sight A second lamp in the belfry burns!
Page 57 - For all people will walk every one in the name of his god, and we will walk in the name of the Lord our God for ever and ever.
Page 17 - Dignity with ease and complacency, the gentleman and soldier, look agreeably blended in him. Modesty marks every line and feature of his face. Those lines of Dryden instantly occurred to me : — " Mark his majestic fabric ; he '.sa temple Sacred by birth, and built by hands divine ; His soul 's the deity that lodges there; Nor is the pile unworthy of the god.
Page 31 - Once, ah, once, within these walls, One whom memory oft recalls, The Father of his Country, dwelt. And yonder meadows broad and damp The fires of the besieging camp Encircled with a burning belt. Up and down these echoing stairs, Heavy with the weight of cares, Sounded his majestic tread ; Yes, within this very room Sat he in those hours of gloom, Weary both in heart and head.
Page 70 - Life's little stage is a small eminence, Inch-high the grave above; that home of man, Where dwells the multitude: We gaze around; We read their monuments; we sigh ; and while We sigh, we sink ; and are what we deplor'd ; Lamenting, or lamented, all our lot!

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