The British Poets: Including Translations ...

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C. Whittingham, 1822
 

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Page 54 - Qh ! would mankind but make these truths their guide, And force the helm from prejudice and pride. Were once these maxims fix'd, that God's our friend, Virtue our good, and happiness our end ; F How soon must reason o'er the world prevail, And error, fraud, and superstition fail! None would hereafter then, with groundless fear, Describe the
Page 51 - The daily bounties of their Maker's care : The great Creator from his heav'nly throne, Pleas'd on the wide-expanded joy looks down, And his eternal law is only this, That all contribute to the general blifs. Nature fo plain this primal law difplays, Each living creature fees it, and obeys ; Each, form'd for all, promotes thro' private care The public good, and juftly taftes its fhare.
Page 30 - ... fam'd the oriental wife For ftedfaft virtue, and contempt of life : Thefe heroines mourn not with loud female cries Their hufbands loft, or with o'erflowing eyes, But, ftrange to tell ! their funeral piles afcend, And in the fame fad flames their forrows end ; In hopes with them beneath the fhades to rove, And there renew their interrupted love.
Page 109 - Breakfafts and auctions wear the morn away, Each evening gives an opera, or a play; Then Brag's eternal joys all night remain, And kindly ufher in the morn again.
Page 176 - d scold and fret, Then in a corner take a seat, And, sourly moping all the day, Disdain alike to work or play. . Papa all softer arts had tried, And sharper remedies applied; But both were vain, for every course He took still made her worse and worse.
Page 52 - We own the rigid lessons of their schools Are widely diff'rent from these easy rules : Virtue, with them, is only to abstain From all that Nature asks, and covet pain ; Pleasure and vice are ever near a-kin, And, if we thirst, cold water is a sin : Heaven's path is rough and intricate, they say, Yet all are damn'd that 'trip, or miss their way ; God is a Being cruel and severe, And man a wretch by his command plac'd here, In sun-shine for a while to take a turn, Only to dry and make him fit to burn.
Page 53 - Scarce any ill to human life belongs But what our follies cause, or mutual wrongs, Or if some stripes from Providence we feel, He strikes with pity, and but wounds to heal.
Page 156 - Could all your arts successful prove, Would you a maid undo, Whose greatest failing is her love, And that her love for you ? Say, would you use that very power You from her fondness claim, To ruin in one fatal hour A life of spotless fame ? Resolve not then to do an ill, Because perhaps you may ; But rather use your utmost skill To save me, than betray.
Page 82 - You would next time such plagues avoid, And visit without previous notice, ' John, John, a coach ! — I can't think who 'tis,' My lady pries, who spies your coach, Ere you the avenue approach ;
Page 65 - As FIELDING'S now, her eyes all hearts inflame, Like her in beauty, as alike in name. 'Twas when the fummer fun, now mounted high, With fiercer beams had fcorch'd the glowing...

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