A Biographical Chronicle of the English Drama, 1559-1642, Volume 1

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Reeves and Turner, 1891 - 405 pages
 

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Page 345 - O that Ben Jonson is a pestilent fellow ; he brought up Horace, giving the poets a pill ; but our fellow Shakespeare hath given him a purge, that made him bewray his credit.
Page 216 - And whether that my angel be turn'd fiend Suspect I may, yet not directly tell; But being both from me, both to each friend, I guess one angel in another's hell. Yet this shall I ne'er know, but live in doubt, Till my bad angel fire my good one out.
Page 220 - Since there's no help, come, let us kiss and part! Nay, I have done. You get no more of me! And I am glad, yea, glad with all my heart, That thus so cleanly I myself can free. Shake hands for ever! Cancel all our vows! And when we meet at any time again, Be it not seen in either of our brows That we one jot of former love retain.
Page 181 - M. William Shake-speare, His True Chronicle History of the life and death of King Lear, and his three Daughters.
Page 218 - If it were fill'd with your most high deserts ? Though yet, heaven knows, it is but as a tomb Which hides your life and shows not half your parts. If I could write the beauty of your eyes And in fresh numbers number all your graces, The age to come would say ' This poet lies ; Such heavenly touches ne'er touch'd earthly faces.
Page 182 - The Late, And much admired Play, Called Pericles, Prince of Tyre. With the true Relation of the whole Historie, aduentures, and fortunes of the said Prince: As also, The no lesse strange, and worthy accidents, in the Birth and Life, of his Daughter Mariana.
Page 175 - Shakespeare, newly imprinted and enlarged to almost as much again as it was, according to the true and perfect copy.
Page 220 - Gave life and courage to my lab'ring pen, And first the sound and virtue of my name Won grace and credit in the ears of men ; With those, the thronged Theatres that press, I in the Circuit for the laurel strove ! Where the full praise, I freely must confess, In heat of blood, a modest mind might move. With shouts and claps at every little pause, When the proud Round on every side hath rung ; Sadly I sit, unmoved with the applause, As though to me it nothing did belong. No public glory vainly I pursue...
Page 319 - The tragedy of Gowry, with all action and actors, hath been twice represented by the King's players, with exceeding concourse of all sorts of people ; but whether the matter or manner be not well handled, or that it be thought unfit that princes should be played on the stage in their lifetime, I hear that some great counsellors are much displeased with it, and so, it is thought, it shall be forbidden.
Page 218 - Your name from hence immortal life shall have, Though I, once gone, to all the world must die: The earth can yield me but a common grave, When you entombed in men's eyes shall lie. Your monument shall be my gentle verse, Which eyes not yet created shall o'er-read; And tongues to be your being shall rehearse, When all the breathers of this world are dead; You still shall live — such virtue hath my pen — Where breath most breathes, even in the mouths of men.

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