The Public and Private Life of Lord Chancellor Eldon: With Selections from His Correspondence, Volume 2

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J. Murray, 1844 - 516 pages
 

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Page 279 - And whereas the Senate of the United States have approved of the said arrangement and recommended that it should be carried into effect, the same having also received the sanction of His Royal Highness the Prince Regent, acting in the name and on the behalf of His...
Page 224 - Let him study the Holy Scripture, especially the New Testament. Therein are contained the words of Eternal Life. It has God for its author, salvation for its end, and truth, without any mixture of error, for its matter...
Page 53 - He passed the woolsack without looking round, and advanced to the table where the proper officer was attending to administer the oaths. When he had gone through them, the Chancellor quitted his seat, and went towards him with a smile, putting out his hand warmly to welcome him; and, though I did not catch his words, I saw that he paid him some compliment. This was all thrown away upon Lord Byron, who made a stiff bow, and put the tips of his fingers into the Chancellor's hand. The Chancellor did...
Page 334 - K. will try whether he cannot find an Administration which can bring Parliament more into his views than the present Ministers. I don't see how matters can go on a week longer with the present Administration remaining ; I think no Administration, who have any regard for him, will go the length he wishes, as an Administration — -and if they will, they cannot take Parliament along with them. That body is afraid of disclosures — not on one side only — which may affect the monarchy itself.
Page 106 - Sir, — The Prince of Wales having assembled the whole of the male branches of the royal family, and having communicated to us the plan intended to be proposed by his Majesty's confidential servants, to the Lords and Commons, for the establishment of a restricted regency, should the continuance of his Majesty's ever-tobe-deplored illness render it necessary ; we feel it a duty we owe to his Majesty, to our country, and to ourselves, to enter our solemn protest against measures...
Page 35 - Majesty trusts that the divisions natu' rally and unavoidably excited by the late unfortunate and uncalled-for agitation ' of a question so interesting to the feelings and opinions of his people, will " speedily pass away; and that the prevailing sense and determination of all his " subjects to exert their united efforts in the cause of their country, will enable " his Majesty to conduct to an honourable and secure termination the great " contest in which he is engaged.
Page 122 - I considered it my duty to put a question to the noble Viscount on the cross bench (Sidmouth), then a member of the other House, respecting the state of his Majesty's health ; and, though my noble friend at first endeavoured to shift and evade the question, upon being pressed he ended with saying that ' there was no necessary suspension of the royal functions.
Page 325 - Our royal master seems to have got into temper again, — as far as I could judge from his conversation 'with me this morning. He has been pretty well disposed to part with us all, because we would not make additions to his revenue.
Page 41 - Encombe, commanding extensive views,) that the world will be before you when the toil is over ; for so the law world will be, if you make yourself complete master of that book. At present, lawyers are made good, cheap, by learning law from Blackstone and less elegant compilers. Depend upon it, men so bred will never be lawyers, (though they may be barristers,) whatever they call themselves. I read Coke on Littleton through, when I was the other day out of office, and when I was a student I abridged...
Page 325 - Our Queen threatens approach to England ; but if she can venture, she is the most courageous lady I ever heard of. The mischief, if she does come, will be infinite. At first she will have extensive popularity with the multitude ; in a few short months or weeks she will be ruined in the opinion of the world...

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