The History of British India, Volume 4

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Baldwin, Cradock, and Joy, 1820
 

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Page 53 - I do not trust to Mr. Francis's promises of candour, convinced that he is incapable of it. I judge of his public conduct by his private, which I have found to be void of truth and honour.
Page 326 - I resolved," these are the words of Hastings himself, "to draw from his guilt the means of relief to the Company's distresses, — to make him pay largely for his pardon, or to exact a severe vengeance for past delinquency.
Page 450 - He was the first or among the first of the servants of the Company, who attempted to acquire any language of the natives, and who set on foot those liberal inquiries into the literature and institutions of the Hindus which have led to the satisfactory knowledge of the present day.
Page 484 - Board shall be fully authorised to superintend, direct, and control, all acts, operations, and concerns, which in any wise relate to the civil or military government or revenues of the British territorial possessions in the East Indies.
Page 484 - By this bill a board of control was erected, consisting of six members of the privy council, who were "to check, superintend and control all acts, operations and concerns which in anywise relate to the civil or military government or revenues of the territories and possessions of the East India company.
Page 461 - Britain, because they had acted in a manner repugnant to the honour and policy of this nation, and thereby brought great calamities on India, and enormous expences on the East-India company.
Page 461 - Bombay, having in sundry instances acted in a manner repugnant to the honour and policy of this nation, and thereby brought great calamities on India, and enormous expenses on the East India Company, it is the duty of the directors of the said Company to pursue all legal and effectual means for the removal of the said governorgeneral and president from their respective offices, and to recall them to Great Britain.
Page 282 - Mahomedan, died, leaving a widow, and a nephew, who for some time had lived with him, in the apparent capacity of his heir, and adopted son. The widow claimed the whole of the property, on the strength of a will, which she affirmed the husband had made in her favour. The nephew, who disputed the will, both on the suspicion of forgery, and on the fact of the mental...
Page 394 - SIR : When this note is delivered to you by Hoolas Roy, I have to desire that you order the two prisoners to be put in irons, keeping them from all food, etc., agreeably to my instructions of yesterday.
Page 293 - ... to terrify the people ; frequent arrests made for the same cause ; and there is an instance of the purchaser of a zemindary near Dacca, who was ruined by suits commenced by paupers, suits derived from claims prior to his purchase, and who was at last condemned in considerable damages for an ordinary act of authority in his station. Hence the Natives of all ranks become fearful to act in the collection of the revenues. The renters and even hereditary zemindars are driven away, or arrested at the...

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