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" ... foreigners, must have perceived, that, even in the minds of those who condemn the act, the impression made by it has been far more that of respect and admiration, than that of disgust and horror. The truth is, that the guilt of the action, that is... "
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by W. Gardiner - 1808 - 14 pages
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The Monthly Mirror: Reflecting Men and Manners: With Strictures on ..., Volume 4

1808
...has been far more that of respect and admiration, than that of disgust and horror. The truth is, that the guilt of the action, that is to say, the taking...would have incurred; what there is of splendour and magnanimity in it, I mean the publicity and solemnity of the act,' is what few would be capable of...
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A History of the Early Part of the Reign of James the Second: With an ...

Charles James Fox - 1808 - 201 pages
...has been far more that of respect and admiration, than that of disgust and horror. The truth is, that the guilt of the action, that is to say, the taking...associates would have incurred ; what there is of splendor and of magnanimity in it, I mean the publicity and solemnity of the act, is what few would...
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A Vindication of Mr. Fox's History of the Early Part of the Reign of James ...

Samuel Heywood - 1811 - 424 pages
...been far " more that of respect and admiration, than that of dis" gust and horror. The truth is, that the. guilt of the " action, that is to say, the taking...would have incurred ; what there is of " splendour and magnanimity in it, I mean the publicity " and solemnity of the act, is what few would be capable "...
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The British review and London critical journal

1820
...passage in Fox's History of James II, in which the historian states " that the guilt of the action, the taking away the life of the King, is what most men in the place of Cromwell and hit associates would have incurred; what there was of splendour and 'magnanimity in it, I mean the...
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The Trials of Charles the First: And of Some of the Regicides

1832 - 338 pages
...is, that the guilt of the action, — that ' is to say, the taking away of the life of the King, 1 —is what most men in the place of Cromwell ' and...would have incurred : what " there is of splendour and magnanimity in it, " — I mean the publicity and solemnity of the " act, — is what few would be...
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The Trials of Charles the First: And of Some of the Regicides

1832 - 338 pages
...that the guilt of the action, — that " is to say, the taking away of the life of the King, " _is what most men in the place of Cromwell " and his associates...would have incurred : what " there is of splendour and magnanimity in it, " — I mean the publicity and solemnity of the " act, — is what few would be...
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The Trials of Charles the First: And of Some of the Regicides

1832 - 338 pages
...has been far more that of respect and admiration than that of disgust and horror. The truth is, that the guilt of the action, — that is to say, the taking away of the life of the King, — is what most men in the place of Cromwell and his associates would have...
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Lives of Eminent British Statesmen ...: Sir Henry Vane, the Younger; Henry ...

1838
...to raise the character of the English nation in the opinion of Europe in general. The truth is, that the guilt of the action — that is to say, the taking away of the life of the king — is what most men in the place of Cromwell and his associates would have...
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The Eclectic Review

1840
...raise the cha' racier of the English nation in the opinion of Europe in general. ' The truth is, that the guilt of the action — that is to say, the '...associates would have incurred ; what there ' is of splendor and magnanimity in it, — / mean the publicity and f solemnity of the act, is what few would...
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Tracts for the people, designed to vindicate religious and Christian liberty

Tracts - 1840 - 470 pages
...has been far more that of respect and admiration, than that of disgust and horror. The truth is, that the guilt of the action, that is to say, the taking away of the life of the King, is what most men in the place of Cromwell and his associates would have incurred...
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