History of Europe: From the Commencement of the French Revolution to the Restoration of the Bourbons in MDCCCXV [i.e. 1815], Volume 3

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Contents

Mr Grey and Mr Erskines argument for it
11
Character of St Just
12
Answers of Mr Pitt Mr Burke and Mr Jenkinson
13
Parliamentary Reform Arguments by which it vias supported in 1831 note
16
Arguments against it ib
17
It is rejected by the House of Commons ib 12 Bills against correspondence with France and prosecutions for sedition and treason
18
Preparations for war by Great Britain and the Allies
20
Vast effect of the execution of Louis in England
21
Effect of the death of Louis at St Petersburg
22
Treaty between Great Britain and Russia
23
And with Sardinia Prussia Naples and Spain ib 18 Secret designs of Russia
24
Divisions between the Prussians and Austrians
25
Wretched state of the French armies at the commencement of the campaign
26
Prince Cobourg appointed generalissimo of the Allies ib 22 Vast efforts of France
27
Mr Pitts financial measures
28
Designs of Dumourier and of the Allied generals ib 25 Archduke Charles joins the army Repeated disasters of the Republicans
29
Great power now enjoyed by Robespierre
30
Great sensation produced by them in Flanders and efforts of Dumourier
31
Battle of Nerwinde or Neerwinden
32
Defeat of the French ib 29 Disorganisation of the French army and retreat of Dumourier
34
Political designs failure and flight of Dumourier
35
Decree establishing the Polytechnic School
36
Congress at Antwerp to decide on the conduct of the war
37
Disastrous effects of the system then resolved on
38
Forces of the Allies in Flanders and defensive measures of the Convention
39
Defeats on the Rhine of Custines projects ib 36 Siege of Mayence and defeat of the attack on the covering army
40
Fall of Mayence and defeat of the French in attempting to raise the siege
41
The French in Flanders forced back to Famars
42
Storming of the camp at Famars
43
Valenciennes and Condé invested and the former taken
44
Blockade and capitulation of Condé
45
These places taken possession of in name of the Emperor of Austria
46
Disastrous effects of this step
47
Custine takes shelter in intrenched camps ib 45 Rout in the Camp of Cæsar and desperate condition of the French
48
Vigorous measures of the goternment
49
Their efforts to royse the whole population
50
Great levy of 1200000 uten ordered and executed
51
Effect of general suffering in biting the army
53
Carnot warminister His character
54
51 His character as a statesman
56
52 Çamots principles for conducting the war
57
52Aided by the effects of the Revolution
58
And the ability of the Committee of Public Salvation
59
His chpracter and first measures
60
Inciptent divisions of Prussia and Austria
61
Recoghition of the maritime law by the Allies
62
Adoption of the same principles by Britain Prussia and Denmark
63
Absurd policy of the Allies and ruinous division of the army insisted on by the British
64
The British besiege Dunkirk the Austrians Quesnoy
65
Quesnoy falls but the siege of Dunkirk is protracted
66
They accumulate forces there from the Rhine to the Moselle
67
Designs of Carnot and operations of Houchard
68
The siege is raised and ruinous consequence of this defeat on the whole campaign
69
The Republicans do not follow up their success with vigour
70
And Houchard is arrested and executed ib 69 Maubeuge is besieged Jourdan takes the command of the army
71
Vigorous measures of the Committee of Public Salvation
72
the siege
73
Causes of this disaster to the Allies
74
inactivity of the Prussians but the French
75
mand of the army
77
French in Alsace
79
Campaign on the Spanish frontier Successes of the Spaniards on
80
Bidassoa
83
And Eastern Pyrenees Invasion of Roussillon and defeat of the French at Truellas
84
Second defeat of the French at Perpignan
86
Campaign in the Maritime Alps
87
Feeble irruption on the side of Chamberry ib 85 Great discontent in the South of France
88
Abortive insurrection at Marseilles
89
Revolt at Toulon which opens its gates to the English
90
Revolt and siege of Lyons
91
Great efforts of the Republicans for its reduction and cruel conduct of the besiegers
93
Dreadful sufferings of the inhabitants
94
Their heroic defence
95
Précy forces his way through the besiegers lines
97
Town capitulates and sanguinary measures of the Convention
98
Means taken to rouse the people
99
Commencement of the destruction of Lyons
100
Collot d Herbois and Fouchés infamous proceedings
101
First proceedings of the Jacobins at Lyons
104
Proceedings of the Revolutionary Tribunal at Lyons
105
Mournful inscriptions on the walls of the prisons
106
Dreadful measures of the Revolutionary Tribunal
107
Mitraillade of the prisoners
109
Vast numbers who thus perished
110
Butcheries witnessed by Fouché
112
Heroism exhibited by the sufferers
113
Description of Toulon and Allies assembled for its defence
115
Buonaparte obtains the command of the artillery
116
Progress of the siege First action of Buonaparte
117
Capture of Fort Eguillette and the exterior forts ib 109 Evacuation of the place
119
Despair of the inhabitants ib 111 Burning of the arsenal and fleet
120
Horrors of the evacuation
121
Total loss in ships to the French
122
Dreadful cruelty of the Republicans ib 115 Atrocious decree of the Convention against Toulon
123
Promiscuous massacre in the ChampdeMars
124
General reflections on the campaign
125
Immense talent developed in France by the Revolution
126
The democratic element hitherto unknown in modern war
127
Impossibility of a state without a powerful army resisting an invasion
128
Fatal effects of the conversion of the war into one of conquest
129
Vast importance of the frontier fortresses ib 124 Great errors committed by the Allies
130
Ruinous effect of the English reduction of force
131
As exemplified in this campaign ib 127 Cause to which it is owing The passion for reduction among the people
132
The selfish grasping at office by the aristocracy
133
Defects of English education in the same respect
134
CHAPTER XIV
136
Cause of this peculiarity
137
Formation of a new government by the Jacobins
138
Mournful aspect of the Convention and decree vesting supreme power in a few
139
New formation of an executive power in the Committee of Public Salvation
140
Committee of General Safety and Municipality of Paris ib 7 State of the provinces
141
Of Lyons Bordeaux and Marseilles
142
State of the other towns in the South and West of France
143
General coalition of the Departments against the Convention ib 11 And commencement of an insurrection
144
Energetic measures of the Jacobins at Paris to meet the danger
145
The Girondist combination is dissolved
146
Great effect of the federalism imputed to the Girondists
147
Formation of a new constitution
148
Vast powers of the Committee of Public Salvation
149
Formation of Revolutionary Committees over all France
150
Atrocious calculations of these inferior agents of the Revolution
151
This power was everywhere based on the support of the multitude
152
Sunday abolished new division of the Revolution ary Tribunal and decree against English commerce
153
Report of St Just on the state of the Republic
155
Decree vesting supreme power in the Committee of Public Salvation
156
Extraordinary spectacle presented by the prisons of Paris
157
Trial of General Custine
158
Denunciation of the Jolies Intrigantes at the Jacobins and the Convention
159
Situation of Marie Antoinette
160
Cruel treatment of the Dauphin
161
Decree of the Convention on the motion of Barère for the trial of the queen
162
Trial of the queen
164
Her last letter to the Princess Elizabeth
166
Her execution
167
Her character
168
Fatal effects of her alliance with Louis
169
Singular banquet of Robespierre and Barère ib 36 Arrest and death of Bailly ib 37 Of Barnave and Condorcet
171
Trial of the Duke of Orleans
172
Violation of the tombs of St Denis Destruction of monuments over all France
173
Particulars of the spoliation of the tombs
174
State in which the bodies of the kings were found
175
Bodies of Du Guesclin and Turenne
176
Destruction of monuments over all France
177
Abjuration of Christianity by the Municipality
178
The goddess of reason introduced into the Convention
179
Atheistical decrees of the Municipality of Paris
181
Universal abandonment of religion and closing of the churches
182
General and excessive dissoluteness of manners
183
Confiscation of the property of hospitals and the poor ib 51 Noble firmness of the Bishop of Blois
184
Apotheosis of Marat
185
Vast public measures of the Convention
186
Its enormous expenditure
187
Prodigious issue of assignats Its effects
188
Their rapid depreciation
189
Origin of the law of the maximum on prices
190
Great increase of disorders and gambling from the rapid change of prices
191
Profligacy which everywhere prevailed
192
Official account of the number of prisoners in Paris during the Reign of Terror
194
Forced requisitions of grain horses and carriages
196
Public robbery for the support of the populace of the cities
197
The immense burden it entailed on the state and forced loans from the opulent classes
198
Confusion of the old and revolutionary debt
199
Continued fall of the assignats Severe laws against forestallers and all public companies
200
Direful effects of these laws
201
Excessive violence of the people from the rise of prices
202
Renewed measures of severity by the Municipality and the Convention
203
Grinding oppression on the industrious classes
205
And on the poor ib 71 Their destitute and deplorable condition
206
People of Paris put on reduced rations Fresh arbitrary taxation of the opulent
207
Mr Burkes description of France at this period ib 74 Mutual estrangement of the Dantonists and ruling power
209
Principles of the Dantonists
210
Principles of Hébert and the Anarchists
211
Mutual reproaches of the Dantonists and Anarchists
212
Publication of the Vieux Cordelier ib 79 Efforts of Danton to detach Robespierre from the Municipality
214
Culminating point of the Revolution
215
First indication of an intention by Robespierre to destroy the Anarchists
216
Robespierre and St Just resolve to destroy both the Dantonists and Anar chists
217
Dantons speech on returning to the Jacobins
219
Robespierres perfidious speech in regard to him
220
Increase of the powers of government
221
Attacks of the Dantonists on the Anarchists
222
Secret agreement between Robespierre and the Municipality
223
Purification of the Jacobin Club
224
Announcement of the project in the Convention
225
Robespierres speech in support of it
226
Remarkable speech to the same effect by St Just
227
Proscription of the Anarchists
229
Rupture between Danton and Robespierre
230
Speech of Collot dHerbois at the Jacobins
232
Arrest of Danton
233
Violent agitation in the Convention
234
Robespierres speech subdues them
235
Speech of St Just against Danton
236
Their trial and preliminary proceedings
238
Dantons defence
239
Condemnation of Danton and all his party
240
Their execution
242
Alleged conspiracy in the prisons and numerous executions under it
243
Silent proscriptions of the Reign of Terror
245
General reflections on the successive destruction of the Revolutionists
246
CHAPTER XV
248
Origin of the atrocities of the Reign of Terror
249
It springs from sacrificing justice to supposed expedience
250
Great error of dramatists and novelists in this respect
251
Examples of this
252
Principles of Robespierres government after the fall of Danton
253
Universal submission followed the death of Danton
254
Political fanaticism of the period
255
Execution of Malesherbes and his whole family with dEspréménil
304
Execution of the young women from Verdun and Montmartre
310
General apathy of the class of proprietors St Just at Strassburg
316
Henriot and St Just urge vigorous measures
322
Insurrection agreed on at the Jacobins
325
Measures of the Convention to resist him ib 62 Robespierre at length inclines to stop the effusion of blood
327
Measures of the Committee of Public Salvation during Robespierres absence
328
The contest begins in the Convention Robespierres last speech
330
Vehement debate on this speech
333
Extraordinary meeting at the Jacobins
334
Mutual preparations during the night
335
Meeting of the 9th Thermidor
336
Vehement eloquence of Tallien
337
Speech of Billaud Varennes
338
Dreadful agitation in the Assembly
339
Preparations at the Hôtel de Ville ib 81 The cannoneers desert Robespierre
349
Arrest of Robespierre and all his party
350
Dreadful scene after his seizure
351
Executed with St Just Henriot Couthon and all their party
352
Transports of the public and execution of the rest of the party
354
Reflections on the Reign of Terror with the prodigious number of its victims
355
Ease with which these massacres were perpetrated
357
Principle which led to the triumph of the Revolution
359
What long supported and at length terminated this dreadful power
360
Universal destruction by the Revolution of all its supporters
361
Of the clergy and commercial classes ib 92 Of the middle and working classes
362
All this necessarily results from the development of the Revolutionary passion
364
Successive steps of its disastrous progress
365
Manner in which the public mind is corrupted during a revolution
366
Inefficacy of juries as a check on revolutionary crimes
367
Robespierre was the incarnation of the Revolution in internal government
368
Fundamental errors of Robespierres principles
369
Real cause of the atrocities of the Revolution
370
Elevated points of the character of the Jacobins
371
Similarity of the revolutionary to religious fanaticism
372
Great error of the revolutionary historians on this subject
373
Provision for the correction of these excessive evils
375
Military strength of France in consequence of the Revolution
377
And naval weakness
378
Respective navies of the two powers ib 4 Suspension of the Habeas Corpus Act Argument of Mr Fox against it
379
And of Mr Pitt in its support
380
Trials for treason in Scotland
381
And England where Hardy Thelwall and Horne Tooke are acquitted
383
Argument against the war by Mr Fox and the Opposition
385
And its nonsuccess
387
Reply by Mr Pitt and Mr Jenkinson
388
Statement of the objects of the war
389
Impossibility of negotiation
390
Supplies and forces voted for the year 1794 ib 14 British conquests in the West Indies
391
Frightful state of St Domingo ib 16 And in the Mediterranean where Corsica is reduced
392
Preparations for the battle of the 1st June by Admiral Howe and the Channel Fleet
393
Howe breaks the French line
394
Commencement of the action
395
Desperate conflict which ensued
398
Results of the battle
400
Safe arrival of the American convoy in Brest harbour
401
Tactics by which the victory was gained ib 24 Its great moral effect in Great Britain
402
Vast military preparations of the French and their system of war
403
Talent with which their military force was wielded
404
Mr Pitts efforts to hold together the alliance
406
Efforts of the Cabinet of Vienna to prevent the secession of Prussia
407
Prussia openly begins to withdraw
408
But is at length retained in the alliance by a treaty with Great Britain
409
Discontent this excited in the Prussian army ib 32 Plan of the campaign formed by General Mack Forces of the two parties
410
Landrecies taken Efforts of the Republicans to raise the siege Defeat of the French at Troisville
411
Defeat of Clairfait
413
Jourdan ordered up from the Rhine to the Sambre ib 36 Indecisive actions on the Sambre which at length terminate to the dis advantage of the French
415
Battle of Turcoing
416
Fresh indecisive actions ib 40 The Austrian Cabinet in secret contemplate the exchange of Flanders for Bavaria or some Italian province
417
A Council of State is held on this project
418
The abandonment of Flanders is resolved on by the Austrian Cabinet
419
The French again cross the Sambre invest Charleroi and are driven back
420
Arrival of Jourdan with 40000 men investment of Charleroi and sepa ration of the Austrians and British
421
Pichegru attacks Clairfait
422
The Imperialists assemble to succour Charleroi
423
Battle of Fleurus ib 48 Obstinate struggle in the centre
424
Success of the Austrians on the left
425
The Allies retreat though not defeated
426
Efforts of the British government to hold together the alliance
427
Pichegru drives back Clairfait in West Flanders and advances to Brussels
428
Views of the Cabinet of Vienna at this period
429
Diverging retreat of the British and Austrian forces The British retire towards Holland
430
Inactivity of the French
432
Decree of the Convention to give no quarter ib 57 Operations on the Rhine and disasters consequent on the secession of Prussia
433
Inactivity of the Prussians
434
Operations in Piedmont Mont Cenis is carried by the French ib 60 Great success of Napoleon and Massena in the Maritime Alps
435
The Sardinians are driven over the ridge of the Alps
437
War in the Eastern Pyrenees Great financial difficulties of the Spaniards
438
Successes of Dugommier there and total defeat of the Spaniards ib 64 Dugommier follows up his successes Collioure taken
440
Invasion of Spain by the Western Pyrenees ib 66 Great successes of the Republicans in this quarter
441
Siege and capture of Bellegarde
442
Ineffectual proposals for peace by the Spaniards ib 69 Great defeat of the Spaniards near Figueras
443
Their intrenchments carried and Figueras and Rosas taken
444
Invasion of Biscay and defeat of the Spaniards
445
They sue for peace
446
Renewal of hostilities in Flanders ib 74 British retire to the right bank of the Meuse
447
Battle of Ruremonde and retreat of the Austrians ib 76 Who cross the Rhine and Maestricht is taken
448
Active pursuit of the British by the Republicans and retreat of the for mer behind the Waal
449
Efforts of the English Opposition to decry the war and firmness of Mr Pitt
450
But the Austrian and Prussian Cabinets resolve on peace and contract their efforts
451
Siege of Nimeguen and winter campaign in Holland and misunderstand ing between the Dutch and British
452
Extraordinary fatigues and increased efforts of the French army
453
Pichegru projects a winter campaign
454
Description of Holland
455
Dreadful irruptions of the sea in former times
457
Character and habits of the people
458
Influences of this character on their national history ib 88 Immense commerce of the Dutch
460
Population and extent of Holland and its colonies
461
Magnitude and historical celebrity of their towns
462
Military and naval forces of Holland
463
Government and social institutions of the United Provinces
464
Dutch sue for peace in vain and French cross the Waal
468
The Stadtholder embarks for England and a revolution breaks out at Amsterdam which admits the French troops
469
Fall of Utrecht Leyden and Haarlem
470
Dutch fleet captured by the French cavalry ib 101 Extraordinary discipline of the French soldiers and spoliation of their commanders
471
Concluding operations on the Rhine
472
Army of the Moselle occupies Treves and Allies driven across the Rhine
473
Conclusion of the campaign in Savoy
474
Renewal of the war in la Vendée
475
Storming of Thurreaus intrenched camps
476
Chouan insurrection in Brittany and character of Puisaye
477
Immense results of the campaign
478
The prodigious forces of the Republic
479
Immense issues of assignats to uphold these great expenses
480
Progressive increase of the French forces during the campaign
481
The period of success for the Allies was past ib 113 General reflections on the campaign
482
Great military effect of the French fortresses ib 115 Sublime aspect of France at this period in external affairs
483
CHAPTER XVII
485
Physical description of Poland
486
Its great rivers
487
Great fertility of its soil ib 5 Face of the country in the northern provinces
488
Romantic scenery in the neighbourhood of the Carpathian mountains
489
Small cities in Poland
490
Causes of its continued disasters
491
No intermixture of foreign customs in Poland
493
Its society differently constructed from any in Europe
494
They still retain the taste and habits of the nomad tribes
495
Their early and indomitable democratic spirit ib 15 The clergy formed a different body from any in Europe
497
The nobility never engaged in any profession or trade ib 17 Which all fell into the hands of the Jews
498
Liberty and equality the early principles of the people ib 19 The crown was always elective
500
General assemblies of the people and the Liberum veto ib 21 Description of these assemblies
501
Order of the proceedings
502
Splendour of the dresses
503
Evils of the Liberum Veto possessed by each deputy
505
Great increase of the democratic power at the close of the sixteenth century
506
Nature of the national force
507
Their long and desperate wars with the Asiatic tribes
508
And with their European neighbours
509
Their weakness early suggested the idea of dismemberment to the adjoin ing states
510
Noble exploits of John Sobieski ib 33 His prophetic anticipation of the partition of Poland from its democratic divisions
511
With him the Polish power was extinguished
512
Excessive democratic strife after his death
513
Increasing weakness and anarchy of the republic
514
Which made their partition in 1772 easy ib 38 When too late they abandon their ruinous democratic privileges Differ ence of the Polish and French r...
515
Commencement of their last struggle
517
The Poles take up arms from despair and elect Kosciusko as a leader ib 41 Character of Kosciusko who saw the futility of resistance
518
He defeats the Russians at Raslowice Warsaw is taken by the insurgents
519
The Poles in the Russian army disarmed
520
Great exertions of Kosciusko and his countrymen
521
The want of a large regular force proved fatal to them ib 46 The Russians and Prussians move against Warsawand violent tumults there
522
The invaders are compelled to raise the siege and Suwarroff defeats a body of Poles
523
Kosciusko is routed and made prisoner at Maccowice
524
The patriots shut themselves up in Warsaw
525
Storming of Praga and Warsaw by Suwarroff Atrocious massacre by the Russians
526
Great sensation produced in Europe by the fall of Poland ib 52 It fell a victim of democratic madness and oppression
527
Real cause of the ruin of Poland ib 54 Striking contrast afforded by the steady growth of Russia
528
Gallant spirit of the exiled Polish bands
529
Comparison of Polish with English history
530
Just retribution on the partitioning powers ib 58 Their subsequent punishment
531
CHAPTER XVIII
533
Effects of the successes of France in the preceding campaign
534
State of the empire Oct 1794 Treaty between Holland and France
535
Fresh treaty between Austria and Great Britain
536
Arguments in Great Britain against the war
537
Mr Pitts reply
538
Great increase in the patriotic spirit of the people
539
Naval operations in the Mediterranean Combat of la Spezia
540
War in the Maritime Alps
541
French armies strongly reinforced and resume the offensive
542
Preparations for the battle of Loano
544
Commencement of the action ib 16 Disastrous retreat of the Allies and decisive consequences of the battle
545
Tactics by which the battle was gained by the Republicans
546
War in Spain Indecisive operations in Catalonia
547
Treaty with the insurgents
549
Gradual estrangement of the pacified parties from each other
550
Expedition to Quiberon ib 24 Running seafight at Belleisle
551
Landing of the emigrants in Quiberon bay
552
Prodigious agitation in the west of France
553
Vigorous measures of Hoche The invaders are blockaded
554
Their desperate situation
555
Abortive attempts at succour by the Chouan chiefs ib 30 The Royalists are defeated and their intrenchments stormed
556
They are driven into the sea or capitulate
557
Despair and dreadful end of the fugitives
558
Atrocious cruelty of the Republicans
559
Noble conduct and death of Sombreuil and the Royalist prisoners
560
Rapid decline of the Royalist cause in the west of France
561
He attacks the lines round Mayence
569
CHAPTER XIX
575
Contests between the two parties Trial and death of Fouquier Tinville
581
Trial and execution of Carrier and dreadful atrocities divulged in
587
Revolt of the populace to save the Jacobin leaders
593
Humanity of the Thermidorians after their victory The accused are only transported
595
Their subsequent fate at Cayenne ib 26 Renewed efforts of the Jacobins
597
Excessive misery at Paris ib 28 Preparations for the insurrection of the 20th May
598
Danger of the government
599
Convention besieged Heroic conduct of Boissy dAnglas The mob master the Convention
600
But are at length defeated by the Committees and the Troupe Dorée
601
Fresh efforts of the Jacobins
602
Trial and condemnation of Romme and the Jacobin remnant
603
Condemnation of Férauds murderer Disarming of the FaubourgSt Antoine and termination of the reign of the multitude
604
Inextricable difficulty in contracting the assignats
607
Dreadful scarcity in Paris from the abolition of the forced requisitions
608
Miserable fare and sufferings of the people
609
Changes in the laws
610
Unsuccessful measures of the government to arrest the evil ib 43 Further progress of humane measures and abolition of the Revolutionary Tribunal
611
Formation of a new constitution
612
General abandonment of democratic principles from the force of expe rience and violent reaction in the south of France
613
Generous conduct of the Duke of Orleans younger sons and indulgence shown to the Jacobins
614
Last days and death of Louis XVII in prison and liberation of the Duchess dAngoulême
615
Continued captivity of Lafayette and general interest in his behalf
616
Completion of the new constitution
617
The constitution of the Directory
618
Reflections on this constitution
619
Great agitation in Paris and throughout France at these changes ib 53 Coalition of Royalists with sections of national guard
620
Vehement Royalist declamations at the sections ib 55 Extreme agitation at Paris
621
The Convention throw themselves on the army
622
The sections openly resolve to revolt
623
Measures of the Convention Failure of Menou and appointment of Buonaparte
625
His decisive measure in seizing the artillery ib 61 Combat round the Tuileries Defeat of the sections
626
Humanity of the Convention after their victory
627
Election of the council of Ancients and the Five Hundred
628
Reflections on the history of the Convention ib 66 Slow growth of all durable human institutions
629
Reflections on the history of the Revolution and the causes of its disasters
630
Ruinous effect of Neckers duplication of the Tiers Etat
631
Dreadful effect of the emigration of the noblesse ib 70 Effects of the Allied interference
632
Causes of the disasters it induced
633
Establishment of military despotism
634

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Page 267 - A dungeon horrible, on all sides round, As one great furnace flamed; yet from those flames No light; but rather darkness visible Served only to discover sights of woe, Regions of sorrow, doleful shades, where peace And rest can never dwell, hope never comes That comes to all, but torture without end Still urges, and a fiery deluge, fed With ever-burning sulphur unconsumed.
Page 527 - Oh ! bloodiest picture in the book of Time Sarmatia fell unwept, without a crime ; Found not a generous friend, a pitying foe, Strength in her arms, nor mercy in her woe...
Page 456 - Where the broad ocean leans against the land; And, sedulous to stop the coming tide, Lift the tall rampire's artificial pride. Onward, methinks, and diligently slow, The firm connected bulwark seems to grow, Spreads its long arms amidst the watery roar, Scoops out an empire, and usurps the shore — While the pent ocean, rising o'er the pile, Sees an amphibious world beneath him smile ; The slow canal, the yellow-blossom'd vale, The willow-tufted bank, the gliding sail, The crowded mart, the cultivated...
Page 252 - And should I at your harmless innocence Melt, as I do, yet public reason just, Honour and empire with revenge enlarged, By conquering this new world, compels me now To do what else, though damn'd, I should abhor.
Page 165 - So spake the Cherub : and his grave rebuke, Severe in youthful beauty, added grace Invincible : Abash'd the Devil stood, And felt how awful goodness is, and saw Virtue in her shape how lovely ; saw, and pined His loss ; but chiefly to find here observed His lustre visibly impair'd ; yet seem'd Undaunted. If I must contend...
Page 248 - Vice is a monster of such hideous mien, That to be hated, needs but to be seen; But seen too oft', familiar with her face, We first endure, then pity, then embrace.
Page 532 - Yes ! thy proud lords, unpitied land ! shall see That man hath yet a soul— and dare be free ! A little while, along thy saddening plains, The starless night of desolation reigns ; Truth shall restore the light by Nature given, And, like Prometheus, bring the fire of Heaven ! Prone to the dust Oppression shall be hurl'd, Her name, her nature, wither'd from the world...
Page 371 - What though the field be lost? All is not lost; the unconquerable will, And study of revenge, immortal hate, And courage never to submit or yield, And what is else not to be overcome ; That glory never shall his wrath or might Extort from me.
Page 341 - Here sighs, with lamentations and loud moans, Resounded through the air pierced by no star, That e'en I wept at entering. Various tongues, Horrible languages, outcries of woe, Accents of anger, voices deep and hoarse, With hands together smote that swell'd the sounds, Made up a tumult, that for ever whirls Round through that air with solid darkness stain'd, Like to the sand that in the whirlwind flies.
Page 265 - Through me you pass into the city of woe: Through me you pass into eternal pain: Through me among the people lost for aye. Justice the founder of my fabric moved: To rear me was the task of Power divine, Supremest Wisdom, and primeval Love. 19 Before me things create were none, save things Eternal, and eternal I endure. All hope abandon, ye who enter here.

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