The Acropolis of Athens

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Macmillan, 1909 - 405 pages
 

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Page 2 - SLOW sinks, more lovely ere his race be run, ^ Along Morea's hills the setting sun ; Not, as in Northern climes, obscurely bright, But one unclouded blaze of living light ! O'er the hushed deep the yellow beam he throws, Gilds the green wave, that trembles as it glows.
Page 2 - O'er the hush'd deep the yellow beam he throws Gilds the green wave, that trembles as it glows. On old /Egina's rock, and Idra's isle, The god of gladness sheds his parting smile; O'er his own regions lingering, loves to shine, Though there his altars are no more divine.
Page 352 - Zeus, where they sacrifice no living thing ; but they lay cakes on it, and having done so they are forbidden by custom to make use of wine. Inside of the building are altars : one of Poseidon, on which they sacrifice also to Erechtheus in obedience to an oracle ; one of the hero Butes ; and one of Hephaestus. On the walls are paintings of the family of the Butads. Within, for the building is double, there is sea-water in a well. This is not very surprising, for the same thing may be seen in inland...
Page 168 - ... put on those parts of his dress which happened to present themselves at the moment. But it is from this seeming confusion, this variety of attitudes, of dress and preparation, of precipitancy and care, of busy movement and more relaxed effort, that the composition derives so much of its effect. An animated reality is thus diffused throughout the subject, adding interest to every figure and epic grandeur to the whole.
Page 2 - Salamis ! Their azure arches, through the long expanse, More deeply purpled meet his mellowing glance, And tenderest tints along their summits driven Mark his gay course, and own the hues of Heaven ; Till darkly shaded from the land, and deep, Behind his Delphian cliff he sinks to sleep.
Page 351 - All the figures in the gable over the entrance to the temple 5 called the Parthenon relate to the birth of Athena. The back gable contains the strife of Poseidon with Athena for the possession of the land. The image itself is made of ivory and gold. Its helmet is surmounted in the middle by a figure of a sphinx (I will tell the story of the sphinx when I come to treat of Boeotia), and on either side of the helmet are griffins wrought in relief.
Page 351 - The image itself is made of ivory and gold. Its helmet is surmounted in the middle by the figure of a sphinx, and on either side of the helmet are griffins wrought in relief. The image of Athena stands upright, clad in a garment that reaches to her feet; on her breast is the head of Medusa wrought in ivory. She holds a Victory about four cubits high in one hand, and in the other hand a spear. At her feet lies a shield, and near the spear is a serpent." "The Victory referred to by Pausanius...
Page 352 - Endoeus. 6. There is also a building called the Erechtheum. Before the entrance is an altar of Supreme Zeus, where they sacrifice no living thing ; but they lay cakes on it, and having done so they are forbidden by custom to make use of wine. Inside of the building are altars : one of Poseidon, on which they sacrifice also to Erechtheus in obedience to an oracle ; one of the hero Butes ; and one of Hephaestus. On the walls are paintings of the family of the Butads. Within, for the building is double,...
Page 301 - Thus did the Athenians increase in strength. And it is plain enough, not from this instance only, but from many everywhere, that freedom is an excellent thing; since even the Athenians, who, while they continued under the rule of tyrants, were not...
Page 352 - Endoeus was f- s*o an Athenian by birth and a pupil of Daedalus, who also, when Daedalus was in exile because of the death of Calos, followed him to Crete. Made by him is a statue of Athena seated, with an inscription that Callias dedicated the image, but Endoeus made it. There is also a building called the Erechtheum. Before the entrance is an altar of Zeus the Most High, on which they never sacrifice a living creature, but offer cakes, not being wont to use any wine either. Inside the entrance...

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