The Fortunate Union: A Romance, Volumes 1-2

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Printed from the Oriental translation fund, and sold by J. Murray, 1829 - 520 pages
 

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Page 209 - Keeper of the yellow gate, bring us that picture, that we may view it. [Sees the picture.] Ah, how has he dimmed the purity of the gem, bright as the waves in autumn. [To the attendant.•] Transmit our pleasure to the officer of the guard, to behead Maouyenshow and report to us his execution.
Page 9 - ... shall approve. These translations are to be accompanied by the original texts, and such illustrations as may be considered necessary. By the publication of the original text it is intended to...
Page 204 - EMPEROR [recites verses]. During the ten generations that have succeeded our acquisition of Empire, my race has alone possessed the four hundred districts of the world. Long have the frontiers been bound in tranquillity by the ties of mutual oaths. And our pillow has been undisturbed by grief or anxiety. Behold in us the Emperor Yuente, of the race of Han. Our ancestor Kaoute emerged from a private station, and raised his family by extinguishing the dynasty of Tsin, and slaughtering their race. Ten...
Page 247 - THE FORTUNATE UNION, A Romance, translated from the Chinese Original, with Notes and Illustrations ; to which is added, a Chinese Tragedy. By JOHN FRANCIS DAVIS, FRS, &c.
Page 225 - He announces that the renegade, by deserting his allegiance, led to the breach of truce, and occasioned all these calamities. The Princess is no more ! — and the Khan wishes for peace and friendship between the two nations. The envoy attends with reverence your imperial decision. "Emp. — Then strike off the traitor's head, and be it presented as an offering to the shade of the Princess ! Let a fit banquet be got ready for the envoy, preparatory to his return.
Page 210 - Majesty to remit their contributions and extend favor toward them ! EMPEROR. That shall readily be done. Approach and hear our Imperial pleasure. We create you a Princess of our palace. LADY. How unworthy is your handmaid of such gracious distinction ! [Goes through the form of returning thanks.] Early to-morrow I attend your Majesty's commands in this place. The Emperor is gone: let the attendants close the doors : I will retire to rest.
Page 215 - Chow-wong 8 who lost his empire and life entirely through his blind devotion to Takee, is a fit example to warn your Majesty. Our army is weak, and needs the talents of a fit general. Should we oppose the Tartars, and be defeated, what will remain to us? Let your Majesty give up your fondness for the princess, to save your people.
Page 204 - ... Emperor Yuente, of the race of Han. Our ancestor Kaoute emerged from a private station, and raised his family by extinguishing the dynasty of Tsin, and slaughtering their race. Ten generations have passed away since he left this inheritance to us. The four boundaries of the empire have been tranquil; the eight regions at rest! But not through our personal merits; we have wholly depended on the exertions of our civil and military rulers. On the demise of our late father, the female inmates of...
Page 211 - K'han of the Tartars, at the head of his Tribes. K'HAN. I lately sent an envoy to the sovereign of Han, with the demand of a princess in marriage ; but the Emperor has returned a refusal, under the plea that the princess is yet too young. This answer gives me great trouble. Had he not plenty of ladies in his palace, of whom he might have sent me one? The difference was of little consequence.6 Let me recall my envoy with all speed, for I must invade the South with our forces.
Page 195 - Though wit and art conspire to move your mind ; But dulness with obscenity must prove As shameful sure as impotence in love. In the fat age of pleasure, wealth, and ease, Sprung the rank weed, and thrived with large increase ; When love was all an easy monarch's care ; Seldom at council, never in a war...

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