The Travels of a Hindoo to Various Parts of Bengal and Upper India, Volume 1

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N.Trubner & Company, 1869
 

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Page 146 - Wouldst thou the young year's blossoms and the fruits of its decline, And all by which the soul is charmed, enraptured, feasted, fed, Wouldst thou the earth and heaven itself in one sole name combine ? I name thee, O Sakuntala,- and all at once is) said.
Page 156 - Every improvement of the means of locomotion benefits mankind morally and intellectually as well as materially, and not only facilitates the interchange of the various productions of nature and art, but tends to remove national and provincial antipathies, and to bind together...
Page 210 - Fill'd with the face of heaven, which, from afar, Comes down upon the waters; all its hues, From the rich sunset to the rising star, Their magical variety diffuse: And now they change ; a paler shadow strews Its mantle o'er the mountains; parting day Dies like the dolphin, whom each pang imbues •*> With a new colour as it gasps away, The last still loveliest, — till — 'tis gone — and all is gray.
Page 147 - Juliet's story, they seem tenacious to a degree, insisting on the fact — giving a date (1303), and snowing a tomb. It is a plain, open, and partly decayed sarcophagus, with withered leaves in it, in a wild and desolate conventual garden, once a cemetery, now ruined to the very graves. The situation struck me as very appropriate to the legend, being blighted as their love.
Page 273 - The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident; so strong indeed, that no philologer could examine them all...
Page 126 - Behind the bush the bowmen hide, The horse beneath the tree ; Where shall I find a knight will ride The jungle paths with me ? There are five and fifty coursers there, And four and fifty men ; When the fifty-fifth shall mount his steed, The Deckan thrives again !
Page 193 - ... of light from the landscape. Over the pure cloudless sky was the glow of the last light. The great mound threw its dark shadow far across the plain. In the distance, and beyond the Zab, Keshaf, another venerable ruin, rose indistinctly into the evening mist. Still more distant, and still more indistinct, was a solitary hill, overlooking the ancient city of Arbela. The Kurdish mountains, whose...
Page 127 - He then shewed me his garden and pagoda, and after a few common-place expressions of the pleasure I felt in seeing so celebrated a warrior, which he answered by saying with a laugh, he should have been glad to make my acquaintance ehewhere, I made my bow and took leave.

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