The Annals and Magazine of Natural History, Volume 4

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Taylor & Francis, Limited, 1840
 

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Page 38 - Among the floating Mollusca likely to be met with in the tropical latitudes is the Spirula, a small Cephalopod with a chambered shell. An entire specimen of this rare mollusk is a great desideratum ; and if it should be captured alive, its movements should be watched in a vessel of sea-water, with reference more especially to the power of rising and sinking at will, and the position of the shell during those actions-. The chambered part of the shell should be opened under water, in order to determine...
Page 24 - Annals of Natural History; or Magazine of Zoology, Botany and Geology. Being a continuation of the Magazine of Zoology and Botany, and Sir WJ Hooker's Botanical Companion.
Page 433 - The Cephalopod inhabiting the Argonaut repairs the fractures of its shell with a material having the same chemical composition as the original shell, and differing in mechanical properties only in being a little more opake.
Page 38 - As a part of the shell of the Spirula projects externally at the posterior part of the animal, this part should be laid open in the living Spirula, in order to ascertain how far such mutilation would affect its power of rising or sinking in the water. In the event of a living pearly Nautilus (Nautilus...
Page 365 - The facts and views he brings forward eminently merit attention." — British and Foreign Medical Review. DR. ARTHUR JACOB, FRCS, PROFESSOR OF ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY IN THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS IN IRELAND. A TREATISE ON THE INFLAMMATIONS OF THE EYE-BALL. Foolscap 8vo. cloth, 5s. It includes the Description and Treatment of the Idiopathic, Scrofulous, Rheumatic, Arthritic, Syphilitic...
Page 132 - He had been able to verify, what at that time he stated as probable, viz. that all the permanent teeth, with the exception of the first molar, which does not succeed a milk tooth, are developed from the internal surface of cavities of reserve, and that the depending folds of the sacs of composite teeth are formed by the lips of the follicles advancing inwards, after closure of the latter. He then described the progress of development of the pulps and sacs of the teeth in the cow and sheep, from their...
Page 21 - Coccus. 1 imagine therefore that although the Trilobites were to a certain degree sedentary, more particularly the blind ones, they must have had some power of crawling over a flat surface ; but whether they moved by rudimentary, soft, membranaceous feet, or whether it was by means of the undulation of setigerous segments, like the earth-worm, or by wrinkling the under surface of the abdomen, like a Chiton, are questions yet to be determined. One thing however is, in my opinion, clear, from their...
Page 220 - I have drawn up these observations chiefly in the hope of inducing others to present us with similar reviews of the shell-banks of our coast. Geology and zoology will gain as much by inquiring how our marine animals are associated together as by investigating genera and species, though the former subject has, as yet, been but little attended to in comparison with the latter.
Page 37 - Filter the solution when cold. cepting the very minute ones, which will be best preserved in small phials or glass tubes, should be wrapt in a piece of very soft thin linen or cotton cloth, to prevent the legs from being intermixed or lost, as they are very likely to fall off after having been a short time in spirit. A very important object of investigation is the development of the Crustacea, from the earliest period at which they can be observed to the perfect state. They may be readily examined...
Page 159 - ... the sides, arched and sharp above, and straight at the edges below. They live chiefly upon ticks and other small vermin, and may frequently be seen jumping about all the cows and oxen in the fields ; nay, they are often observed to fly on their backs, unless they lie down for them, which, if much troubled with ticks, they generally do when they see the birds about them ; but if the beast be heedless, they hop once or twice round it, looking it very earnestly in the face every time they pass,...

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