The British Drama: Operas and farces

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W. Miller, 1804
 

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Page 54 - The Gamesters and Lawyers are jugglers alike, If they meddle your all is in danger: Like Gypsies, if once they can finger a souse, Your pockets they pick, and they pilfer your house, And give your estate to a stranger. A man of courage should never put any thing to the risque, but his life.
Page 49 - Parting with him! why that is the whole scheme and intention of all marriage articles. The comfortable estate of widowhood is the only hope that keeps up a wife's spirits.
Page 63 - Which way shall I turn me? how can I decide? Wives, the day of our death, are as fond as a bride. One wife is too much for most husbands to hear, But two at a time there's no mortal can bear. This way, and that way, and which way I will, What would comfort the one, t'other wife would , take ill.
Page 53 - Before the barn-door crowing, The cock by hens attended, His eyes around him throwing, Stands for a while suspended. Then one he singles from the crew, And cheers the happy hen; With how do you do, and how do you do, And how do you do again.
Page 48 - Yes, indeed, the Sex is frail. But the first time a Woman is frail, she should be somewhat nice methinks, for then or never is the time to make her Fortune. After that, she hath nothing to do but to guard herself from being found out, and she may do what she pleases.
Page 57 - How happy could I be with either, Were t'other dear Charmer away!
Page 49 - I dare say, the Captain himself would like that we should get the reward for his death sooner than a stranger. Why, Polly, the Captain knows, that as 'tis his employment to rob, so 'tis ours to take Robbers; every man in his business. So that there is no malice in the case.
Page 47 - I'll insure thee from being hanged; and going to sea. Filch, will come time enough upon a sentence of transportation. But now, since you have nothing better to do, ev'n go to your book, and learn your catechism; for really a man makes but an ill figure in the ordinary's paper, who cannot give a satisfactory answer to his questions.
Page 66 - Ladies, I hope you will give me leave to present a partner to each of you. And (if I may without offence) for this time, I take Polly for mine. And for life, you slut,— for we were really married.
Page 65 - Through the whole piece you may observe such a similitude of manners in high and low life, that it is difficult to determine whether (in the fashionable vices) the fine gentlemen imitate the gentlemen of the road, or the gentlemen of the road the fine gentlemen.- Had the Play remain'd, as I at first intended, it would have carried a most excellent moral.

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