Brambletye House: Or, Cavaliers and Roundheads : a Novel, Volume 2

Front Cover
Colburn, 1826 - 413 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents


Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 162 - She'd come again, and with a greedy ear Devour up my discourse. Which I observing, Took once a pliant hour; and found good means To draw from her a prayer of earnest heart, That I would all my pilgrimage dilate.
Page 108 - The Queen arrived with a train of Portuguese ladies in their monstrous fardingales, or guard-infantes, their complexions olivader * and sufficiently unagreeable. Her Majesty in the same habit, her fore-top long and turned aside very strangely. She was yet of the handsomest countenance of all the rest, and, though low of stature, prettily shaped, languishing and excellent eyes, her teeth wronging her mouth by sticking a little too far out ; for the rest lovely enough.
Page 155 - A day with not too bright a beam, A warm, but not a scorching sun, A southern gale to curl the stream, And, master, half our work is done.
Page 121 - I was witness of, the King sitting and toying with his concubines, Portsmouth, Cleveland, and Mazarine, &c., a French boy singing love-songs,* in that glorious gallery, whilst about twenty of the great courtiers and other dissolute persons were at Basset round a large table, a bank of at least 2000 in gold before them ; upon which two gentlemen who were with me made reflections with astonishment. Six days after was all in the dust...
Page 185 - And her eyes, she did enslave me. But her constancy's so weak, She's so wild and apt to wander, That my jealous heart would break Should we live one day asunder. Melting joys about her move, Killing pleasures, wounding blisses, She can dress her eyes in love, And her lips can arm with kisses; Angels listen when she speaks, She's my delight, all mankind's wonder; But my jealous heart would break, Should we live one day asunder.
Page 31 - The very head and front of my offending Hath this extent, no more. Rude am I in my speech, And little bless'd with the soft phrase of peace ; For since these arms of mine had seven years...
Page 184 - My dear Mistress has a heart Soft as those kind looks she gave me ; When, with love's resistless art, And her eyes, she did enslave me ; But her constancy's so weak, She's so wild and apt to wander, That my jealous heart would break Should we live one day asunder.
Page 121 - I can never forget the inexpressible luxury and profaneness, gaming, and all dissoluteness, and as it were total forgetfulness of God, (it being Sunday evening,) which this day se'nnight I was witness of, the King sitting and toying with his concubines, Portsmouth...
Page 121 - I was witnesse of, the King sitting and toying with his concubines, Portsmouth, Cleaveland, and Mazarine, &c. a French boy singing love songs,* in that glorious gallery, whilst about 20 of the greate courtiers and other dissolute persons were at basset round a large table, a bank of at least 2000 in gold before them, upon which two gentlemen who were with me made reflexions with astonishment. Six days after was all in the dust!
Page 120 - I was told to-day, that, upon Sunday night last, being the King's birth-day, the King was at my Lady Castlemaine's lodgings, over the hither-gate at Lambert's lodgings, dancing with fiddlers all night almost ; and all the world coming by taking notice of it.

Bibliographic information