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CASSELL, PETTER, GALPIN & Co.:

LONDON, PARIS & NEW YORK.

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CONTENTS.

26

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. 130
· 134

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SECTION IV.-NORTH AMERICA.

Extent, Countries, Surface. 167 The United States- The Far

The United States

170 West—The Pacific States 196

The United States—New England The United States-California 198

and Middle Atlantic States 174 The Dominion of Canada
The United States-South Atlan-

Physical Features

202
tic and South Central States 177 The Dominion of Canada-The
The United States-North Cen-

St. Lawrence and the Great

tral States and Territories 181

Lakes

205

The United States, The Missis- The Dominion of Canada-Cli:

sippi.

183

mate

207

The United States—The Prairies 188 The

Dominion of Canada-Pro-

The United States—The Rocky

vinces, Chief Towns, New-

Mountain States and Terri-

foundland

211

tories

192 Mexico

216

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THE

MODERN GEOGRAPHICAL READERS.

THE WORLD.

Section 1.--INTRODUCTORY-Land and Water, Climate,

Interchange of Productions.

LESSON 1.

THE LAND.

1. Our world may well-nigh be called a world of waters, for on the surface of our planet water is the rule and land the exception. The waters stretch themselves over an area of 1511 millions of square miles, whilst the land, which rises above their surface, occupies only 51; millions.

2. Nor is the distribution of this land at all regular. There is three times as much land in the hemisphere north of the equator as in the corresponding southern hemisphere. If, however, we divide the world into two hemispheres, having southern England and New Zealand respectively for their centres, nearly all the land will be found in the former hemisphere, and the latter will be a vast ocean containing innumerable islands, of which Australia and New Zealand are the chief.

3. There are two enormous masses of land, which, as they are surrounded by the ocean, might be called islands ; but, from their vast extent, are commonly called conti

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