Journal of Psychological Medicine, Volume 2

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Page 606 - tis fittest. CORDELIA: How does my royal lord? How fares your majesty? LEAR: You do me wrong to take me out o' the grave: Thou art a soul in bliss; but I am bound Upon a wheel of fire, that mine own tears Do scald like molten lead.
Page 612 - AB of [insert residence and profession or occupation (if any)], and that the said AB is a [lunatic, or an idiot, or a person of unsound mind], and a proper person to be taken charge of and detained under care and treatment, and that I have formed this opinion upon the following grounds, viz: 1.
Page 467 - Then the devil taketh him up into the holy city, and setteth him on a pinnacle of the temple, and saith unto him, If thou be the Son of God cast thyself down ; for it is written He shall give his angels charge concerning thee, and in their hands they shall bear thee up, lest at any time thou dash thy foot against a stone.
Page 365 - than I can say ; I never remember any " weather that was not too hot, or too cold ; too wet, " or too dry ; but, however God Almighty contrives " it, at the end of the year tis all very well.
Page 605 - Thou must be patient; we came crying hither. Thou know'st, the first time that we smell the air, We wawl, and cry: — I will preach to thee; mark me. Glo. Alack, alack the day ! Lear. When we are born, we cry, that we are come To this great stage of fools...
Page 599 - On the stage we see nothing but corporal infirmities and weakness, the impotence of rage ; while we read it, we see not Lear, but we are Lear,' — we are in his mind, we are sustained by a grandeur which baffles the malice of daughters and storms ; in the aberrations of his reason, we discover a mighty irregular power of reasoning, immethodised from the ordinary purposes of life, but exerting its powers, as the wind blows where it listeth, at will upon the corruptions and abuses of mankind.
Page 360 - Therefore, do not flatter yourself that separation will ever change my sentiments; for I find myself unquiet in the midst of silence, and my heart is at once pierced with sorrow and love. For Heaven's sake, tell me what has caused this prodigious change on you, which I have found of late.
Page 364 - I remember," says he, in that letter, speaking of Swift, "as I and others were taking with him an evening walk, about a mile out of Dublin, he stopped short; we passed on; but perceiving he did not follow us, I went back, and found him fixed as a statue, and earnestly gazing upward at a noble elm, which in its uppermost branches was much withered and decayed. Pointing at it, he said, 'I shall be like that tree, I shall die at top.
Page 590 - And let not women's weapons, water-drops, Stain my man's cheeks! — No, you unnatural hags, I will have such revenges on you both That all the world shall, — I will do such things, — What they are yet I know not ; but they shall be The terrors of the earth. You think I'll weep ; No, I'll not weep : — I have full cause of weeping ; but this heart Shall break into a hundred thousand flaws Or ere I'll weep.
Page 360 - ... tis not in the power of time or accident to lessen the inexpressible passion which I have for * * * "Put my passion under the utmost restraint, send me as distant from you as the earth will allow, yet you cannot banish those charming ideas which will ever stick by me whilst I have the use of memory. Nor is the love I bear you only seated in my soul, for there is not a single atom of my frame that is not blended with it.

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