An Improved Grammar of the English Language

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Sidney Babcock, 1839 - 192 pages
 

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Page 87 - A wise son maketh a glad father: but a foolish son is the heaviness of his mother.
Page 154 - is toil and trouble; Honor, but an empty bubble; Never ending, still beginning, Fighting still, and still destroying: If the world be worth thy winning, Think, O think it worth enjoying; Lovely Thais sits beside thee, Take the good the gods provide thee.
Page 155 - For who, to dumb forgetfulness a prey, This pleasing, anxious being e'er resigned, Left the warm precincts of the cheerful day, Nor cast one longing, lingering look behind...
Page 76 - Their idols are silver and gold, the work of men's hands. They have mouths, but they speak not : eyes have they, but they see not...
Page 147 - That, changed through all, and yet in all the same; Great in the earth, as in the ethereal frame; Warms in the sun, refreshes in the breeze, Glows in the stars, and blossoms in the trees; Lives through all life, extends through all extent; Spreads undivided, operates unspent!
Page 154 - I have found out a gift for my fair; I have found where the wood-pigeons breed; But let me that plunder forbear, She will say 'twas a barbarous deed: For he ne'er could be true, she averr'd, Who could rob a poor bird of its young; And I loved her the more when I heard Such tenderness fall from her tongue.
Page 156 - See through this air, this ocean, and this earth, All matter quick, and bursting into birth! Above, how high progressive life may go ! Around, how wide ! how deep extend below ! Vast chain of being! which from God began; Natures ethereal, human, angel, man, Beast, bird, fish, insect, what no eye can see, No glass can reach; from infinite to thee; From thee to nothing...
Page 24 - Some place the bliss in action, some in ease, Those call it Pleasure, and Contentment these...
Page 142 - A brute arrives at a point of perfection that he can never pass : in a few years he has all the endowments he is capable of; and, were he to live ten thousand more, would be the same thing he is at present.
Page 86 - To reform and not to chastise I am afraid is impossible, and that the best precepts, as well as the best laws, would prove of small use if there were no examples to enforce them. To attack vices in the abstract, without touching persons, may be safe fighting indeed, but it is fighting with shadows.

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