The Three Presidencies of India: A History of the Rise and Progress of the British Indian Possessions, from the Earliest Records to the Present Time ; with an Account of Their Government, Religion, Manners, Customs, Education, Etc., Etc

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Ingram, Cooke, 1853 - 492 pages

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Page 397 - The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident; so strong indeed, that no philologer could examine them all...
Page 402 - Perfect truth; perfect happiness; without equal ; immortal; absolute unity; whom neither speech can describe, nor mind comprehend ; all-pervading ; all-transcending; delighted with his own boundless intelligence, not limited by space or time ; without feet, moving swiftly ; without hands, grasping all worlds ; without eyes, all-surveying ; without ears, all-hearing ; without an intelligent guide, understanding all ; without cause, the first of all causes ; all-ruling; all-powerful; the Creator, Preserver,...
Page 375 - Elizabeth under the name of the Governor and Company of Merchants of London trading to the East Indies.
Page 193 - Governor-general in council, therefore, for the safety of the subjects, and the security of our districts, already seriously alarmed and injured by the approach of the Burmese armies, has felt himself imperatively called on to anticipate the threatened invasion. The national honour no less obviously requires, that atonement should be had for wrongs so wantonly inflicted and so insolently maintained ; and the national interests equally demand that we should seek, by an appeal to arms, that security...
Page 109 - Africa, and into and from the islands, ports, havens, cities, creeks, towns, and places of Asia, Africa, and America, or any of them, beyond the cape of Bona Esperanza, to the Straits of Magellan...
Page 193 - Ava, and a demonstration was actually made to enter his territory, when the advance of the British troops frustrated the execution of their hostile design. " The deliberate silence of the Court of Amerapoora, as well as the combination and extent of the operations undertaken by its officers, leave it no longer doubtful that the acts and declarations of the subordinate authorities are fully sanctioned by their Sovereign, and that that haughty and barbarous Court is not only determined to withhold...
Page 15 - ... India. Here we find but little regularity in the direction of elevation. In many clusters, of which I have taken ground plans, the granite appears to have burst through the crystalline schists in lines irregularly radiating from a centre, or in rings resembling the denticulated periphery of a crater. The most remarkable of the insulated clusters and masses of granite on the table-land of the peninsula are those of Sivagunga, Severndroog, Ootradroog, Nundidroog, Chundragooty, and Chitteldroog,...
Page 354 - ... that on both sides of the canal down to Hissar, trees, of every description, both for shade and blossom, be planted, so as to make it like the canal under the tree in Paradise...
Page 484 - He proposed to continue the relations of the Board of Control to the Board of Directors as they stand, but to change the constitution and limit the patronage of the Court of Directors. The thirty members of the Court were to be reduced to eighteen — twelve elected in the usual way, and six nominated by the Crown from persons who have been Indian servants for ten years. With respect to patronage, now entirely in the hands of the Court of Directors, it was proposed to do away altogether with, nomination...
Page 287 - from morn to noon, from noon to dewy eve ;' and, despite this, he is a haggard, poverty-smitten, wretched creature. This is no exaggeration ; even in ordinary seasons, and under ordinary circumstances, the ryots may often be seen fasting for days and nights for want of food. The inability of the ryot to better his degraded condition, in which he has been placed by the causes we have named, is increased by his mental debasement. Unprotected, harassed, and oppressed, he has been precluded from the...

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