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But, independently of these considerations, the very nature of my subject supplies a reason for the choice which I have made. For I know not, in truth, to whom. I could, with greater propriety, inscribe a work, whose chief end is to expose false reasoning and to maintain true religion, than to one, in whom the powers of just reasoning are so conspicuously displayed, and by whom the great principles of religion are so sincerely reverenced.

With these views, I trust, that I shall stand excused by you, my dear Sir, in having, without your knowledge, thus availed myself of the credit of your name. The following treatise, in which so many additions have been made to a former publication, as in some measure to entitle it to the appellation of a new work, I submit to your judgment; well satisfied, that if it meet your approbation, it will not find an unfavourable reception from the public. I am, my dear Sir, With the truest attachment, Your affectionate Friend and Servant,

THE AUTHOR.

Trinity College, Dublin,

Sept. 21, 1809.

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No. XVI.-On Dr. John Taylor's scheme of Atonement 110

No. XVII.-The doctrine of Atonement falsely charged with

the presumption of pronouncing on the necessity of Christ's

death

113

No. XVIII.-On the mode of reasoning, whereby the sufficien-

cy of good works without mediation is attempted to be de-

fended from Scripture

116

No. XIX.-The want of a discoverable connexion between the

means and the end, equally applies to every Scheme of Atone-

ment

119

No. XX.-On the Scripture phrase of our being reconciled to

God

121

No. XXI.-On the true distinction between the laying aside

our enmity to God, and being reconciled to God

123

No. XXII.—On the proofs from Scripture, that the Sinner is

the object of the Divine displeasure

123

No. XXIll.-Instance from the book of Job, of Sacrifice being

prescribed, to avert God's Anger

126

No. XXIV.-On the Attribute of the divine justice

126

No. XXV.-On the text in John, describing our Lord as the

Lamb of God, which taketh away the sins of the world 128

No. XXVI.-On the meaning of the word propitiation in the

New Testament

130

No. XXVII.—On the texts describing Christ's death as a sacri-

fice for sin

131

No. XXVIII.-on the word kajassarh, translated as

Atonement in Rom. v. 11.

141

No. XXIX.-On the Denial that Christ's death is described in

Scripture as a sin-offering

142

No. XXX.-On the sense, in which Christ is said in Scripture

to have died for us

143

No. XXXI.-On the pretence of figurative allusion in the Sa-

crificial terms of the New Testament

146

No. XXXII.- Arguments to prove the sacrificial language of

the New Testament figurative, urged by H. Taylor and

Dr. Priestley

148

No. XXXIII. On the sense entertained generally by all, and

more especially instanced amongst the Jews, of the neces-

sity of propitiatory expiation

148

No. XXXIV.-On H. Taylor's objection, of the want of a lite-

ral correspondence between the Mosaic sacrifice and the

death of Christ

167

No. XXXV.-On the arguments by which it is attempted to

169

prove the passover not to be a sucrifice

No. XXXVI.-On the meaning of the word translated atone-

ment, in the Old Testament

181

No. XXXVII.-On the efficacy of the Mosaic atonement, as

applied to cases of moral transgression

181

No. XXXVIII.-On the vicarious import of the Mosaic sacrifi-

197

No. XXXix. On the imposition of hands upon the head of the

victim

204

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No. XLVI.- On the supposition that sacrifice originated in

Priestcraft

267

No. XLVII.-on the supposition that the Mosaic sacrifices ori-

ginated in human invention

267

No. XLVIII. Sacrifices explained as gifts by various writers 275

No. XLIX.-Sacrifices explained as federal rites

276

No. L.Bishop Warburton's Theory of the Origin of Sacrifice 280

No. LI.-The supposition that sacrifices originated in gifts, er-

281

No. LII.—on the date of the permission of animal food to man 282

No. LIII.-On the divine origin of language

289

No. LIV.-On the natural unreasonableness of the Sacrificial

rite

300

No. LV.--On the universality of Sacrifice

300

No. LVI.-On the universality of the notion of the expiatory

virtue of Sacrifice

303

No. LVII.-On the objections against the supposition of the

divine institution of Sacrifice

304

No. LVIII.-On the Sacrifice of Abel as evincing the divine

institution of Sacrifice

310

No. LIX.-On the history and the book of

312

No. LX.-On Grotius's strange misconception of the nature of

Abel's Sacrifice

368

No. LXI.-On the difference in the divine reception of the

sacrifices of Cain and Abel

371

No. LXII.-On the true meaning of the phrase, NAEIONA

OTSIAN, attributed to the Sacrifice of Abel

373

No. LXIII.-On the nature and grounds of the faith evi-

denced by the Sacrifice of Abel

378

No. LXIV.-On the probable time and occasion of the institu-

tion of Sacrifice

381

No. LXV.--On the true interpretation of the passage, Gen.

iv. 7. containing God's expostulation with Cain

384

No. LXVI.-On the comparison between the Sacrifice of Abel

and that of Christ

392

No. LXVII.-On the nature of sacrifice before the law : tend-

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