The Lives of the Most Eminent British Painters, Sculptors, and Architects

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Page 47 - The other shape, If shape it might be called that shape had none Distinguishable in member, joint or limb; Or substance might be called that shadow seemed; For each seemed either; black it stood as night, Fierce as ten furies, terrible as Hell, And shook a dreadful dart; what seemed his head The likeness of a kingly crown had on...
Page 10 - There is no instance of a man before Gibbons who gave to wood the loose and airy lightness of flowers, and chained together the various productions of the elements with a free disorder natural to each species.
Page 29 - Close to those walls where Folly holds her throne, And laughs to think Monroe would take her down, Where o'er the gates, by his famed father's hand, Great Gibber's brazen, brainless brothers stand ; One cell there is, conceal'd from vulgar eye, The cave of Poverty and Poetry.
Page 140 - This draws new clients daily to my house, Women and men of every sex and age, That bring me presents, send me plate, coin, jewels, With hope that when I die (which they expect Each greedy minute) it shall then return Tenfold upon them; whilst some, covetous Above the rest, seek to engross me whole, And counter-work the one unto the other, Contend in gifts, as they would seem in love...
Page 42 - ... Western Europe. It is therefore probable that the general idea of the work might be brought from the East, by some of the Crusaders. But there are two arguments strongly in favour of the execution being English ; the family name of the Bishop is English, " Joceline Troteman;" and the style, both of sculpture and architecture, is wholly different from the Tombs of Edward the Confessor and Henry III., which were by Italian artists.
Page 55 - How firm established on eternal truth; Fervent in doing well, with every nerve Still pressing on, forgetful of the past, And panting for perfection...
Page 43 - The third of these works is the monument of Richard Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, in St. Mary's Church, Warwick ; a gilt bronze figure of the earl in the act of prayer lies on a richly ornamented marble pedestal, round which are several beautiful small gilt bronze statues, standing in niches, supporting canopies over them. The figures are so natural and graceful, the architecture so rich and delicate, that they are excelled by nothing done in Italy of the same kind at this time, although Donatello...
Page 223 - In this resolution Mrs. Flaxman fully concurred. They resolved to prepare themselves in silence for the journey, to inform no one of their intentions, and to set meantime a still stricter watch over their expenditure. No assistance was proffered by the Academy, nor was any asked ; and five years elapsed, from the day of the memorable speech of the President, before Flaxman, by incessant study and labour, had accumulated the means of departing for Italy. " The image of Flaxman's household immediately...
Page 4 - Gibbon to Charles II., who was too indolent to search for genius, and too indiscriminate in his bounty to confine it to merit ; but was always pleased when it was brought home to him.
Page 126 - They wish to make no noise." I put Clara aside and looked at him. He was standing with his back to the fire and his hands clasped behind him; and I knew by the black look on his face that passion was boiling within. I had seen just such a look before he attacked me, that March night, in the adjoining chamber; and, though I could make every allowance for his anger, I confess I trembled for the consequences. He gazed straight...

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