The Literary Attractions of the Bible: Or, A Plea for the Word of God, Considered as a Classic

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Charles Scribner, 1865 - 441 pages

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Page 213 - Sweet is the breath of morn, her rising sweet, With charm of earliest birds ; pleasant the sun, When first on this delightful land he spreads His orient beams, on herb, tree, fruit, and flower, Glistening with dew ; fragrant the fertile earth After soft showers ; and sweet the coming on Of grateful evening mild...
Page 243 - WHO can find a virtuous woman ? for her price is far above rubies. The heart of her husband doth safely trust in her, so that he shall have no need of spoil. She will do him good and not evil all the days of her life. She seeketh wool, and flax, and worketh willingly with her hands. She is like the merchants' ships ; she bringeth her food from afar.
Page 216 - Whose adorning, let it not be that outward adorning of plaiting the hair, and of wearing of gold, or of putting on of apparel ; but let it be the hidden man of the heart, in that which is not corruptible, even the ornament of a meek and quiet spirit, which is in the sight of God of great price.
Page 349 - Thine eyes did see my substance, yet being unperfect; and in thy book all my members were written; Which in continuance were fashioned, when as yet there was none of them.
Page 226 - Entreat me not to leave thee, or to return from following after thee ; for whither thou goest, I will go ! and where thou lodgest, I will lodge ; thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God. Where thou diest I will die, and there will I be buried : the Lord do so to me, and more also, if aught but death part thee and me.
Page 125 - I am not worthy of the least of all the mercies, and of all the truth, which thou hast shewed unto thy servant; for with my staff I passed over this Jordan, and now I am become two bands.
Page 244 - She is not afraid of the snow for her household. For all her household are clothed with scarlet.
Page 77 - Rise up, my love, my fair one, and come away. For, lo, the winter is past, the rain is over and gone; The flowers appear on the earth; the time of the singing of birds is come, and the voice of the turtle is heard in our land; The fig tree putteth forth her green figs, and the vines with the tender grape give a good smell. Arise, my love, my fair one, and come away.
Page 244 - She openeth her mouth with wisdom ; and in her tongue is the law of kindness. She looketh well to the ways of her household, and eateth not the bread of idleness. Her children rise up and call her blessed ; her husband also, and he praiseth her.
Page 72 - He bowed the heavens also, and came down: And darkness was under his feet. And he rode upon a cherub, and did fly: Yea, he did fly upon the wings of the wind.

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