Pictorial History of the Middle Ages: From the Death of Constantine the Great to the Discovery of America by Columbus

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C. J. Gillis, 1846 - 360 pages
 

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Not really that many pictures but it is very easy reading. I am not a history buff but have found it enjoyable.

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Page 14 - If we consider literature in its widest sense, as the voice which gives expression to human intellect, — as the aggregate mass of symbols, in which the spirit of an age, or the character of a nation, is shadowed forth...
Page 120 - ... marriage had raised him above the pressure of want, he avoided the paths of ambition and avarice; and till the age of forty, he lived with innocence, and would have died without a name. The unity of God is an idea...
Page 119 - In the familiar offices of life he scrupulously adhered to the grave and ceremonious politeness of his country: his respectful attention to the rich and powerful was dignified by his condescension and affability...
Page 123 - Jerusalem, an obscure town on the confines of Syria was pillaged by the Saracens, and they cut in pieces some troops who advanced to its relief: an ordinary and trifling occurrence, had it not been the prelude of a mighty revolution. These robbers were the apostles of Mahomet; their fanatic valour had emerged from the desert; and in the last eight years of his reign Heraclius lost to the Arabs the same provinces which he had rescued from the Persians.
Page 354 - ... them. In the works of this great moralist, the duties of the sovereign are as strictly laid down as those of his subjects ; and while they are enjoined to obey him as a father, he is exhorted to take care of them as though they were his children. There was nothing new in this patriarchal system of government, which had existed from the very beginning of the monarchy ; but it was brought into a more perfect form, and the mutual obligations of princes and people were more clearly defined, than...
Page 144 - In the name of the most merciful God, Harun al Rashid, commander of the faithful, to Nicephorus, the Roman dog. I have read thy letter, O thou son of an unbelieving mother. Thou shalt not hear, thou shalt behold my reply.
Page 267 - Damascus soon after concluding this truce with the princes of the crusade : it is memorable that, before he expired, he ordered his winding-sheet to be carried as a standard through every street of the city; while a crier went before, and proclaimed with a loud voice, " This is all that remains to the mighty Saladin, the conqueror of the East.
Page 149 - Leo suddenly placed a precious crown on his head, and the dome resounded with the acclamations of the people, long life and victory to Charles, the most pious Augustus, crowned by God, the great and pacific emperor of the Romans.
Page 25 - Ambrose was tempered by prudence ; and he contented himself with signifying an indirect sort of excommunication, by the assurance that he had been warned in a vision not to offer the oblation in the name or in the presence of Theodosius ; and by the advice that he would confine himself to the use of prayer, without presuming to approach the altar of Christ, or to receive the Holy Eucharist with those hands that were still polluted with the blood of an innocent people. The emperor was deeply...
Page 120 - From enthusiasm to imposture, the step is perilous and slippery : the daemon of Socrates affords a memorable instance, how a wise man may deceive himself, how a good man may deceive others, how the conscience may slumber in a mixed and middle state between self-illusion and voluntary fraud.

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