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SOCINIANISM ; its spirit described, iii. 24. Its tendency, 28. Characterized

as a system of negations, 28, 29. Its affinity with Deism, 29-32, 349. Its
anti-devotional character, 32, 33. Its association with materialism and fatalism,

34, 35. Its declining state in England, ii. 325-327.
SOCINIANS ; propriety of the appellation, ii. 315-317. Supposed connexion

of their principles with the love of freedom, 30–32. Their salvability disproved,
ii. 256, 266. .Strictures on the union of orthodox and Socinian ministers in

London, 291.
SOCRATES; his modesty, iii. 313.
SOLON; singular law enacted by him, ii. 51.
“SPIRIT ;” various uses of the word in Scripture, iii. 22.
SPIRIT, HOLY ; his personality, ini. 21, 22. Necessity for his influence,

i. 125, iii. 400-404. Promise of that influence, i. 146–148. Importance of
duly estimating it, 235. Excellence and dignity of the gift, 236, 237. Spiritual
life wholly dependent upon it, 237, 238. Its communication to be sought by
prayer, 238, 239.

Habitual dependence urged, 239, 240. Nature and causes
of Divine withdrawment, 240. Holiness essential to the enjoyment of Divine
influence, 240–242. Desirableness of watching such circumstances as are
- favourable to its manifestation, 243, 244. Dignity of the Christian, as a
temple of the Holy Ghost, 245. Remarks on the mysteriousness of his in,
fluence, iii. 318, 319. Want of Christian zeal in those who deny the doctrine,
404. Reasons why we are sometimes in danger of forgetting it, 405, 406.
The sin of grieving the Holy Spirit, 408. Abundant manifestation of his in-

fluence yet to be expected, 411, 412.
SPIRITUALITY OF GOD; its connexion with his natural attributes, iii.

296–303. Establishes an intimate relation between God and his intelligent
creatures, 303. Constitutes him the Supreme Good, and the source of all hap-

piness, 304–307.
STAEI., Madame de, iii. (Mem.) 81.
STATE OF RELIGION in Great Britain, before the last war, i. 91, 94-101.
STEPNEY ACADEMY, i. 132, 133. Theological principles on which it was

founded, ii. 443. Advantages of its situation, ib.
STERNE, i. 74.
STEWART, Dugald; character of his writings and style, iii. (Mem.) 80.
STRICT BAPTISTS; the only class who contend for the exclusion of Chris-

tians from the Lord's table, i. 320. Their inconsistency argued, in holding
communion with Pedobaptists in every thing but the Lord's Supper, 336–338,
411, 428, 429, ii. 178, 179; in not charging the Pedobaptists with criminality
for observing the Lord's Supper, i. 343, 344; in not treating them as the apos-
tles would have treated unbaptized persons, 410, 411, 430, 431; in admitling
their salvability, 414–416, 431, 432; and in regarding them as Christians while
destitute of the supposed evidence of faith, 421.
STRICT COMMUNION ; its principles stated, i. 292. Its unfavourable in-

fluence on the prosperity of the Baptist denomination, 285, 503. Examination
of the argument froin the supposed priority of baptism to the Lord's Supper,
293–304; from the apostolic commission, 304-306, 406 ; from the connexion
between circumcision and the passover, 306–308, 313, 314 ; from apostolic
precedent, 311, 312, 407, 409, 410, ii. 216–218 ; from antiquity, i. 316-321,
481, 434–487. Opposed to brotherly love, 322–324. Chargeable with the
guilt of schism, 333, 334, ii. 220–222. Operates as a punishment with regard
to Pedobaptists, i. 337–341, 474–481. Contrary to the Scripture doctrine of
forbearance, 324–328. Its impolicy, 355-358, ii. 226–228. * Resemblance to
the intolerant principles of the Church of Rome, i. 358, 451. Implies a claim
to infallibility, 408, 450, 451. Its coincidence with the opus operatum of the
Church of Rome, 433-435. Produces interminable discord and confusion, 466–
463. Renders the New Testament inapplicable to Pedobaptists, 468,470. Is
incompatible with the unity of the church, 490-492. Answer to the assertion
that it is founded on the principle of defending one neglected truth, 496–198.
Dependence of the practice on human authority, 469, 470, 475, 476. Its un
favourable effects on the minds of its advocates, 487.

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STUART, Professor, of Andover, U. S.; character of his “Exegetical Essays,"

&c., ij. 359 (note).
SUBSTITUTION of the innocent for the guilty, a doctrine peculiar to revela-

tion, i. 267. Fitness of the substitution of Christ, 266–280. Moral tendencies

of the doctrine, 281-283.
SUNDAY-SCHOOLS; seriousness with which religious instruction should be

communicated in them, i. 125, 126. Proposed by Bishop Horsley to be placed

under the control of the clergy, ii. 175.
SUPERSTITION; a much greater evil than enthusiasm, ii. 185.
SUTCLIFF, Rev. J.; his eminent humility, ii. 388. His steady and cheerful

piety, ib. His concern for the prosperity of the churches, 389. General esteem

in which he was held, ib.
SYNAGOGUES ; their origin and advantages, iii. 160. Resemblance between

them and Christian places of Worship, 161. Government of the synagogues

supposed to be the model from which Christian churches are formed, 162.
TECHNICAL TERMS; their origin, ii. 244. Their excessive use in religious

works deprecated, 243. Advice respecting the most proper course to be adopted,

245, 246.
TEMPLE ; none in heaven, iii. 38. Difference between the Jewish temple and

the synagogues, 161. Contrast between its services and the employments of

the blessed in heaven, 200-202.
TERTULLIAN ; his views of baptism, i. 318. On the unity of the church,

489. His statement of the extensive prevalence of Christianity, ü. 513

(note).
TÈST ACT ; its inefficiency and iniquity, ii. 32–35.
TILLOTSON, Archbishop ; character of his works, ii. 293.
TIME ; difference of the manner in which it is apprehended by God and by man,

iii. 190–193. The impression of its progress diminished by happiness, increased

by misery, 191.
TOLERATION ; grounds on which it should be mutually exercised by Chris.

tians, i. 326. Application of the principles to the case of the Baptists and
Pedobaptists, 327, 328, 457, 459, 460. Explanatory remarks, 344, 346, 348.
Distinction between tolerating and practising, 443, 444. Instances in which
toleration has been exercised in regard to the neglect of the plain commands
of Christ, 465, 466. Toleration considered as implying freedom of com-
munication as well as freedom of thought, ii. 117. The denial of such freedom
chargeable with the guilt of persecution, ib. The happy influence of toleration
on the state of this country, 185. Impolicy of attempting to interfere with it,

186, 187.
TOLLER, Rev. T.; his birth and parentage, ii. 390. His early conversion, ib.

Enters the academy at Daventry, ib. Visits Kettering, 391. Becomes pastor
of the independent church there, 392. Favourable influence of the piety of
the congregation in forming his own character, ib. His ministerial qualifica-
tions and labours, 393, 394. His acquaintance with Mr. Hall, 394, 395.
Unsuccessful attempts to remove him from Kettering to London, 396, 397.
Remarks on the low state of the church, compared with the congregation, 396.
Ardour with which Mr. Toller engaged in the cause of the Bible Society, 397.
His peculiar opinions on missionary operations, 398. Beneficial effects of an
illness, ib. His love of natural scenery, 399. His admirable talent for expound-
ing Scripture, 100. His eminence in public prayer, 401. Notice of a defect in
his preaching, ib. His last illness and death, 402, 403. His style of composi.
tion described, 403. Sketch of his character, 404–406. Comparison between

Mr. Fuller and Mr. Toller, 406, 407.
TRINITY, the, i. 373, iii. 271. Practical influence of the doctrine, 318.
TRUST IN GOD, iii. 323. Reasons why it should be implicit and entire,

324.
TRUTH; legitimate means of maintaining and defending it, i. 452.
TUCKER, Abraham; Mr. Hall's opinion of his “ Light of Nature," iii. (Mero)

UNION of Christians; urged by the prevalence of infidelity, i. 18. Its desirable-

ness, 131. Importance of it, 289." Its manifestation in the primitive ages,
322, 335. Grounds on which separation is justifiable, 335. Increase of the
spirit of union in modern times, iii. 420.

VANITY. See Pride.
VANITY OF MAN ; apart from his immortality considered, iii. 380-387.
VILLAGE PREACHING ; charged with a political object by Bishop Horsley,

ii. 171. The charge repelled, 173–175. Answer to the insinuation that village
preachers vilify the established clergy, 179–184. Vindication of their labours
from the charge of fanaticism, 184, 185. Abstinence from political reflections,
recommended, 194. Importance of inculcating the duties of Christianity, in
connexion with its doctrines, urged, 194, 195. Direct appeal to the con-

sciences of men advised, 195, 196.
VIRGIL; character of his writings, iii. (Mem.) 66.
VIRTUE; incapable of being sustained by infidelity, i. 26, 27. Remarks on

President Edwards's definition, 43 (note).

WAGES ; their decline should always be proportioned to the actual deficiency in

the demand for labour, ii. 139. Injustice of lowering them beyond that pro-
portion, ib. Propriety of endeavouring to raise them by voluntary associations

and funds, 140, 141.
WALDENSES; their sentiments on baptism, i. 482.
WALPOLE, Sir Robert, ii. 63.
WAR; the most awful scourge of Providence, i. 59. The horrible waste of

human life which it occasions, 60, 61. Miseries endured in an invasion, 61.
Effects of war on the general prosperity of a country, 62. War founded in
injustice, 63. Its anti-moral tendencies and effects, 64, 65. Peculiar character

of the war of the French revolution, 66-68.
WARFARE, CHRISTIAN ; its character, iii. 104–106. Compared with the

wars of Israel with the Canaanites, 108–111.
WESLEY, Rev. John, iii. 217, (Mem.) 82.
WHITFIELD, Rev. G., ii. 288, iii. (Mem.) 82.
WICKED, the ; the ends answered by their destruction, iii. 58. Their temporary

prosperity, 112.
WILBERFORCE, W., Esq.; character of his work on “Practical Christianity,"

i. 96.
WILLIAMS, J. B., Esq. ; remarks on his edition of the Life of Philip Henry, iii.

277.
WISDOM ; distinguished from knowledge, iii. 121, 122. Importance of spiritual

wisdom, 123–125.
WORLD, the ; comparison of the state and hopes of its votaries with those of

the Christian, i. 194–196. The world compared to a wilderness, iii. 373, 374
Moral disorder of the world, 380. Renunciation of the world an essential part

of the Christian profession, 103.
WORSHIP ; defined, ii. 156. Not to be controlled by the will of the magistrate,

ib. The claims of God upon man in this respect prior to all human laws,
197. The right to worship not resigned on entering into civil society, ib. No
danger to be apprehended from the universal acknowledgment of that right,
198. Answer to the objection, that fanaticism will be encouraged thereby,
195–199. Public worship greatly neglected in this country, i. 102. Its im-
portance, iii. 53.

XAVIER ; anecdote of him, iii. 420.

YOUNG, the ; their danger when exposed to infidel or impure associates, iii.

480-483. Urged to separate themselves from such connexions, 485–487.
ZEAL WITHOUT INNOVATION;" review of, ü. 254–289. Professed
object of the publication, 256. Its party spirit and bigotry, 257. Lamenta-
VOL. III.-MM

tions of the author over the success of the dissenters, 257, 258. Tendeney
of his sentiments to produce pride and intolerance, 259, 260. Increase of
the dissenters owing to their superior piety and zeal, 260. Inefficacy of
creeds and confessions to perpetuate religious belief, 261, 262. Answer to
the charge that dissenting principles tend to democracy, 263, 264. Absurdity
of supposing that real religion would be promoted by the destruction of dissent,
264–266. Union among Christians only to be attained through the increasing
prevalence of genuine piety, 266, 267. The author's gloomy picture of the
state of religion in the established church, 268. The true reasons of that
declension assigned, 269. Exposure of the writer's ignorance and inaccuracy,
269, 270. Gradual decline of evangelical preaching in the Church of England,
271, 272. Its revival through the labours of Whitfield and Wesley, 272.
Virulent opposition of the clergy in general, 272-274. Sentiments and labours
of the evangelical clergy described, 274–278. Answer to the charge of enthu-
siasm brought against them, 279. Their attachment to the established church,
280. Unpopularity of the other clergy, 280, 281. Defence of the method of
preaching adopted by the evangelical clergy, 282–284. Malignant spirit of the
author exposed, 285. Injurious tendency of his censures, 286. His partiality,
ib. Unhappy effects of the needless exposure of the supposed failings or errors
of good men, 287. True character of Whitfield and his coadjutors, 288, 289.
Danger of excluding evangelical ministers from the established church, 289.
General character of the work, iii. 233.

INDEX OF TEXTS.

V. 42

PAGE
Vol. i. 360–362

üi. 459-466
iii. 50

i. 205–224
i. 432
iii. 174-130
iii. 332-340
299, 300

370
386, 387
iii. 78-84
iii. 59-64
ii. 26-31

PAGE
Vol. iii. 54 John iv. 1

iii. 51-56
iii. 13-16

viii. 44
iii. 168-174 xxi. 7
iii. 93–101 Acts x.
iii. 372–380 xi. 26
iii. 114

xiii. 25
iii. 106-112
iii. 444-451 xix. 1-5
iii. 130-137
iii. 423-428 xxvi. 9-18
iii. 24,28–35 Rom. viii. 12
iii. 112-116 xiii.
i. 59-75

xiv. 1-5; xv.
iii. 380-387

1, 6, 7
iii. 145–148 1 Cor. xv. 3
iii. 363-371

26
iii. 193–196

33
88-92 2 Cor. iv. 1

vi. 13
i. 117-126 Gal. i. 15, 16
iii. 509-521 iv. 4, 5
üii. 310–331 Ephes. ii. 1
ii. 137-142

12
iii. 487-493

iv. 5
16-19

i.

{ 462-464

iii. { 353-362

iii. { 295-310

Gen. vi. 26

vi. 11
Exod. iï. 14

XX. 7
Levit. xii. 45
Num. xxi. 4
Deut. vi. 6,7
Josh. v. 13-15
2 Sam. vii. 16, 17
1 Chron. xvi. 43
Job ii. 4
Psalm xix. 7

Xxxvii. 31
xlvi. 8, 9
lxxxix. 47
xciv. 19
xcvii. 2
cxviii. 24

vi. 11, 12

iii. 22, 23
iii. 387-398
iii. 475–487

i. 135–155
iii. 452-458
iii. 74-78
iii. 494-509
iii. 70-73
i. 23-52
i. 425
iii. 49, 50

24-28
iii. 340-353

497
i. 327
iii. 449
iii. 185–188
iii. 496

.

cxlv. 11
Prov. xix. 2

xxii. 2

xxv. 2
Eccles. xi. 8
Isa. ii. 18

Xxxi. 3
xxxii. 13-15

liii. 8
Jer. viii, 6

xv, 9
xxx. 21

xxxi. 18
Ezek. xiv. 14

xv, 2
Matt. iv. 1

v. 12
xii. 36
xvi. 1-3
xxii. 41, 42

xxviii. 19
Luke vii. 5

xiv. 28
xv. 7
xvii. 5
xvii. 20

xxi. 19
John i. 35, 36

iii. 37

X. 36

iii. 398-413 Phil. ii. 5-9
i. 265-282
i. 85-111 iii. 15, 16

i. 179-201 Col. i. 19
iii. 125-1291 Tim. ii. 1
iii. 142-145

15
iii. 187

v. 21
iii. 57-59 Heb. i. 14
ii. 22-48

ix. 8
iii. 164–168
iii. 169

xii. 9
iii. 414-423 James i. 5
iii. 19-21

18
iii. 21, 22

iv. 10
iii. 157-1631 Peter v. 8
iii. 101-106 2 Peter iii. 8
iii. 466-474 1 John iii. 7, 8
iii. 117-121

14
iii. 408 Rev. ii. 1
lii. 156

v. 6
iii. 428-444 xxi. 22

iii. 35-40

i. 381
iii. 154-157
üi. 18
iii. 121-125
iii. 65-70
iii. 149-154
iii. 41-51
iii. 189-193
iii. 50
üi. 180-185
iii. 196–198
iii. 84-88
iii. 199-203

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