The Great Lakes: Or Inland Seas of America; Embracing a Full Description of Lakes Superior, Huron, Michigan, Erie, and Ontario; Rivers St. Mary, St. Clair, Detroit, Niagara, and St. Lawrence: Lake Winnipeg, Etc.; Together with the Commerce of the Lakes, and Trips Through the Lakes: Giving a Description of Cities, Towns, Etc., Forming Altogether a Complete Guide for the Pleasure Traveller and Emigrant

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C. Scribner, 1863 - 191 pages
 

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Page 98 - I hear the tread of pioneers Of nations yet to be ; The first low wash of waves, where soon Shall roll a human sea. The rudiments of empire here Are plastic yet and warm ; The chaos of a mighty world Is rounding into form...
Page 40 - We have met the enemy and they are ours; two ships, two brigs, one schooner and one sloop.
Page 95 - French gray predominating. There are also bright blues a'nd greens, though less frequent. All of the tints are fresh, brilliant, and distinct, and harmonize admirably with one another, which, taken in connection with the grandeur of the arched and...
Page 52 - CW, is situated at the mouth of a river of the same name, where is a good harbor for steamers and lake craft.
Page 98 - Behind the scared squaw's birch canoe, The steamer smokes and raves ; And city lots are staked for sale Above old Indian graves. I hear the tread of pioneers Of nations yet to be ; The first low wash of waves, where soon Shall roll a human sea.
Page 75 - Whose banquets, morning dews ; whose heroes, storms ; Whose warriors, mighty winds ; whose lovers, flowers ; Whose orators, the thunderbolts of God ; Whose palaces, the everlasting hills ; Whose ceiling, heaven's unfathomable blue ; And from whose rocky turrets battled high, Prospect immense spread out on all sides round ; Lost now between the welkin and the main, Now walled with hills that slept above the storm.
Page 94 - Island harbor, high cliffs are seen to the cast, which form the commencement of the series of rocky promontories, which rise vertically from the water to the height of from one hundred to one hundred and twenty-five feet, covered with a dense canopy of foliage. Occasionally a small cascade may be seen falling from the verge to the base in an unbroken curve, or gliding down the inclined face of the cliff in a sheet of white foam. The rocks at this point begin to assume fantastic shapes; but it is...
Page 76 - How sweet the moonlight sleeps upon this bank! Here will we sit, and let the sounds of music Creep in our ears: soft stillness and the night Become the touches of sweet harmony. Sit, Jessica. Look, how the floor of heaven Is thick inlaid with patines...
Page 94 - ... may be seen falling from the verge to the base in an unbroken curve, or gliding down the inclined face of the cliff in a sheet of white foam. The rocks at this point begin to assume fantastic shapes ; but it is not, until having reached Miners' river, that their striking peculiarities are observed. Here, the coast makes an abrupt turn to the eastward, and just at the point where the rocks break off and the friendly sand-beach begins, is seen one of the grandest works of nature in her rock-built...
Page 106 - Marie, is advantageously situated at the mouth of the river of the same name. The river is about 200 feet wide at its mouth, with a sufficient depth of water over the bar for large steamers.

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