The Speeches of the Right Honorable William Huskisson: With a Biographical Memoir, Supplied to the Editor from Authentic Sources...

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Page 375 - ... or to regulate the mode of carrying on any manufacture, trade, or business, or the management thereof...
Page 21 - That an humble address be presented to his Royal Highness the Prince Regent, that he will be graciously pleased to give directions...
Page 475 - ... that although, as a matter of mere diplomacy, it may sometimes answer to hold out the removal of particular prohibitions or high duties, as depending upon corresponding concessions by other states in our favour, it does not follow that we should maintain our restrictions in cases where the desired concessions on their part cannot be obtained ; our restrictions would not be the less prejudicial to our own capital and industry, because other governments persisted in preserving impolitic regulations...
Page 35 - And be it further enacted, that for the' support of his majesty's household, and of the honour and dignity of the crown...
Page 30 - ... it is absolutely necessary that there should be a clear surplus of the income of the country, beyond the expenditure, of not less than 5,000,000 ; and that, with a view to the attainment of this important object, it is expedient now to increase the income of the country by the imposition of taxes to the amount of 3,000,000 per annum.
Page 164 - Mr. Montague, the then chancellor of the exchequer, proposed, and parliament adopted, the following resolution : — " That this House will not alter the standard of the gold and silver coins of this kingdom in fineness, weight, or denomination.
Page 473 - ... that, unfortunately, a policy, the very reverse of this, has been, and is more or less adopted and acted upon by the government of this and of every other country ; each trying to exclude the productions of other countries, with the specious and well-meant design of encouraging its own productions...
Page 527 - I consider it to be the duty of a British statesman, in internal as well as external affairs, to hold a middle course between extremes ; avoiding alike extravagances of despotism, or the licentiousness of unbridled freedom — reconciling power with liberty: not adopting hasty or ill-advised experiments, or pursuing any airy and unsubstantial theories ; but not rejecting, nevertheless, the application of sound and wholesome...
Page 529 - on this side only of idolatry ' of that great man, is called forth by the glorious course which he ran, and for the illumination which he shed over his country. But I do not think it the duty of a most zealous worshipper to adopt even the accidental faults of the illustrious model whom we vainly endeavour to imitate. I do not think it a part of fealty to him to adopt, without necessity, measures which necessity alone forced upon him. Treading, with unequal pace, in his steps, I do not think it our...
Page 316 - I propose to admit a free intercourse between all our Colonies and other countries, either in British ships, or in the ships of those countries, allowing the latter to import all articles, the growth, produce, or manufacture of the country to which the ship belongs, and to export from such Colonies all articles whatever of their growth, produce, or manufacture, either to the country from which such ship came, or to any other part of the world, the United Kingdom, and all its dependencies, excepted.

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