The Good-natured Man: And She Stoops to Conquer

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Houghton Mifflin, 1908 - 198 pages
 

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Page 18 - What a tedious uncomfortable day have we had of it ! We were told it was but forty miles across the country, and we have come above threescore ! HASTINGS.
Page 28 - ... prentice, or one of the duchesses of Drury-lane. Pshaw ! this fellow here to interrupt us. Enter HARDCASTLE Hard. Gentlemen, once more you are heartily welcome. Which is Mr. Marlow ? Sir, you are heartily welcome. It's not my way, you see, to receive my friends with my back to the fire.
Page 6 - Ay, your times were fine times indeed; you have been telling us of them for many a long year. Here we live in an old rumbling mansion, that looks for all the world like an inn, but that we never see company. Our best visitors are old Mrs. Oddfish, the...
Page 23 - We have laughed at that these twenty years — ha! ha! ha! Hard. Ha ! ha ! ha ! The story is a good one. Well, honest Diggory, you may laugh at that ; — but still remember to be attentive. Suppose one of the company should call for a glass of wine, how will you behave? A glass of wine, sir; if you please. (To Diggory.) — Eh, why don't you move Dig. Ecod ! your worship, I never have courage till I see the eatables and drinkables brought upo' the table, and then I'm as bauld as a lion.
Page 67 - Give me joy, George! Crown me, shadow me with laurels! Well, George, after all, we modest fellows don't want for success among the women.
Page 20 - And I detest your three chairs and a bolster. TONY. You do, do you? — then, let me see — what if you go on a mile further, to the Buck's Head ; the old Buck's Head on the hill, one of the best inns in the whole county?
Page 9 - You know our agreement, Sir. You allow me the morning to receive and pay visits, and to dress in my own manner; and in the evening I put on my housewife's dress to please you.
Page 7 - And am I to blame ? The poor boy was always too sickly to do any good. A school would be his death. When he comes to be a little stronger, who knows what a year or two's Latin may do for him ? HARD.
Page 41 - You mean that in this hypocritical age there are few that do not condemn in public what they practise in private, and think they pay every debt to virtue when they praise it.
Page 9 - Pray, my dear, disappoint them for one night, at least. Tony. As for disappointing them, I should not so much mind; but I can't abide to disappoint myself!

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