Cities of India

Front Cover
A. Constable and Company, Limited, 1903 - 350 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 26 - The impotent man answered him, Sir I have no man, when the water is troubled, to put me into the pool : but while I am coming, another steppeth down before me.
Page 209 - Thou wast not born for death, immortal bird ! No hungry generations tread thee down; The voice I hear this passing night was heard In ancient days by emperor and clown; Perhaps the self-same song that found a path Through the sad heart of Ruth, when, sick for home, She stood in tears amid the alien corn; The same that oft-times hath Charmed magic casements, opening on the foam Of perilous seas, in faery lands forlorn.
Page 250 - They have turned aside quickly out of the way which I commanded them: they have made them a molten calf, and have worshipped it, and have sacrificed thereunto, and said, These be thy gods, O Israel, which have brought thee up out of the land of Egypt.
Page 271 - And bore him to a chapel nigh the field, A broken chancel with a broken cross, That stood on a dark strait of barren land. On one side lay the Ocean, and on one Lay a great water, and the moon was full.
Page 146 - O thou afflicted, tossed with tempest, and not comforted, behold, I will lay thy stones with fair colours, and lay thy foundations with sapphires. And I will make thy windows of agates, and thy gates of carbuncles, and all thy borders of pleasant stones.
Page 57 - We'll bury him; and then, what's brave, what's noble, Let's do it after the high Roman fashion, And make Death proud to take us.
Page 198 - Said Jesus, on whom be peace! The world is a bridge, pass over it, but build no house there. He who hopeth for an hour, may hope for eternity; the world is but an hour, spend it in devotion ; the rest is worth nothing.
Page 1 - About the House was a delicate Garden, voiced to be the pleasantest in India, intended rather for wanton Dalliance, Love's Artillery, than to make resistance against an invading Foe...
Page 146 - In this hall was the famous Peacock Throne, so " called from its having the figures of two peacocks " standing behind it, their tails being expanded, and " the whole so inlaid with sapphires, rubies, emeralds, " pearls and other precious stones of appropriate colours
Page 42 - The Governor and Company of Merchants of London trading with the East Indies'.

Bibliographic information