The London encyclopaedia, or, Universal dictionary of science, art, literature, and practical mechanics, by the orig. ed. of the Encyclopaedia metropolitana [T. Curtis]., Part 2, Volume 6

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Thomas Curtis (of Grove house sch, Islington)
 

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Page 664 - The cheerful haunts of man ; to wield the axe And drive the wedge in yonder forest drear, From morn to eve, his solitary task. Shaggy, and lean, and shrewd, with pointed ears And tail cropped short, half lurcher and half cur, His dog attends him.
Page 406 - And when the disciples saw him walking on the sea, they were troubled, saying, It is a spirit ; and they cried out for fear. 27 But straightway Jesus spake unto them, saying, Be of good cheer ; it is I ; be not afraid.
Page 400 - OH for a lodge in some vast wilderness, Some boundless contiguity of shade, Where rumour of oppression and deceit, Of unsuccessful or successful war, Might never reach me more.
Page 703 - What's Hecuba to him, or he to Hecuba, That he should weep for her? What would he do, Had he the motive and the cue for passion That I have?
Page 657 - I did tell him, you must get men of a spirit, and, take it not ill what I say (I know you will not,) of a spirit that is likely to go on as far as gentlemen will go, or else I am sure you will be beaten still.
Page 604 - How charming is divine Philosophy! Not harsh and crabbed, as dull fools suppose, But musical as is Apollo's lute, And a perpetual feast of nectar'd sweets, Where no crude surfeit reigns.
Page 616 - I renounce and refuse, as things written with my hand, contrary to the truth which I thought in my heart, and written for fear of death, and to save my life, if it might be...
Page 546 - Compared with this, how poor Religion's pride, In all the pomp of method, and of art, When men display to congregations wide, Devotion's...
Page 394 - And there are also many other things which Jesus did, the which, if they should be written every one, I suppose that even the world itself could not contain the books that should be written.
Page 718 - Now stir the fire, and close the shutters fast, Let fall the curtains, wheel the sofa round, And while the bubbling and loud hissing urn Throws up a steamy column, and the cups, That cheer but not inebriate, wait on each, So let us welcome peaceful evening in.

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