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* N.B.—Genitive case scarcely used, the nominative case is used instead of it.

illi
alli
yelli

et

Near

So

Here

|it, ing There

at, ang Where Above

mél Below

erg, neshg Between

nárth, káshi
Without, outside pormud
Within

ulf
Far

podthdshi

keehuri
Little

yeddi, kinud
Much

upam
How much yet
As

yingei

ingei
Thus

ingei, angei
How

hyage
Why?

áed Yes

ha No

á
Do not

achadi
Or

illade
This

avan That

adu Which?

yddu
What?

én
Who?

ár
Eat

thedth biné
Drink

uạth bini
Sleep

vorchth bin or vorginé
Wake

edaderth bini
Laugh

karth bini

aţth bini Be silent

bokkiru Speak

leshth bini or arversh bini

|iyáne alle yeye méle kriyage nadle porenje úluli dúrame vottle kunade yeddame yéje yete áte áte, angei yége yendea ha illa véda illave avane adu yéde géna áre tiggene unikiene pat kene mekikene karsibe attube bhévé mansbe

méle, vodega
kria
naduve
horasu
volage
dura
Vottura, sari
kuna, konji
tumba, appara
yéja
hyinge, yetate
hinge
háge
yétete, hyage
yéka

illei
béda
illave, illadhóle
avana
adu
yéadu
yéna
yáru
tinane
kușidane
voragine
yleddane
naggedane
áltáné peculiar sound
súmagiru, sappe niru
nudi dane, nátádine

illi

linge alli

ange
yelli

yenge
méle

mele, móke
kelage

kálake
paļuve

naduve
honage

valli
vollage

ulle
dúra

dúra
pakkaru

kitta
vosi

konja
appara

tumba
yesaga

yettani
yetate

yepadi
háge

ipadi
báge

ipadi
yetate

yepadi
yéka

yenna
haudu

ama
illa

ille
bóda

vánda
innadhole

illavitta
avana

ava
adu

adu
yavadu

yédu
yénu

yenna
yaru

áru
tipke
kúdike

rombuvo
like the Badaga yélke
verbs

jirike
éke
summa iru
peshike

Weep

[graphic]

Come
Go
Stand up
Sit down
I walk
Run
I give
Take away
I strike
I kill
I raise
I put down
I hear
I understand
Tell
Good
Bad
Cold
Hot
Raw
Sweet
Sour
Bitter
Handsome
Ugly
Straight
Crooked
Black
White
Red
Green

The difference of the several dialects of the hill tribes consists not exactly in the idiom of the languages, but
chiefly in their pronunciation. Therefore the same or nearly the same word in the mouth of a Toda with his
pectoral pronunciation can scarcely be recognised as the same in the mouth of the Kotas with their dental pro-
nunciation. The Badaga and Kurumba dialects are midway between the former two with regard to pronun-
ciation, only the Badaga is a little more guttural than the Kurumba. There is a little difference in the dialects
of the several Badaga tribes, those who came at a later period to the hills-for instance the Kangaru ("Lingaites "),
who emigrated from Targuru-speaking a purer Canarese than the common Badagas.

The Todas also have some slight difference in their pronunciation according to the different districts they
inhabit;

for instance, some pronounce the s quite pure, others like the English th, and others like z* The names of the Toda tribes are not quite correct in the letter of Mr. Hodgson. They are the following five : Peikee, Kenna, Pekkan, Kuttan, Tódi. The chief tribe is the Peikee, which pronounces the s like th.

Long
Short
Tall man
Short man
Great
Round
Square
Fat
Thin
Thirst
Hunger
Weariness

nirigiti
kurigiti
nirigi al
kuruda moch
etud
caret
caret
bechiti
kinud
nircbásti
bir erthti
caret

uddame
mone
uddaman
mod ale
dadda
mudde
satte
porále
vottale
arthóje
pețți hoje
salupu

udda
mone
uddava
moneava
dadda
urutu
jauka
|kobbu
kuna
arupu
hasu
salupu

udda
mone, kúle
uddalu
kúle alu
dodda
urute
jauka
gobbu
melle
arupu
hasu
salupu

uddya
kúle
udda manisha
kúle manisha
dodda
ruțţe
javuka
kolupu
vadage
véke
passi
salipu

* The th English is more especially Burmese ; the rest is generally true of the northern tongues, which, even when they possess an
ordinary sibilant series, prefer the use of the equivalent z series, or 2, zy (Ellis' zh) and dz, whereof the first is a simple sound; the second
a sliding sound, as in azure, pleasure, English, and = the French j in jeu; the third is the harsh modification of the sound. Several conso-
nants besides 2 take the sliding sound represented by the blended y. This modification of the primitive sound of the precedent consonant
may be seen in respect to the consonant p in the English pure and puling, which I write pyur and pyuling; and so of all consonants
followed by y. Another almost universal trait of Tartaric phonology is the exceeding commonness of the French eu, as heard in jeu afore-
said. In the above paper I have not thought it prudent to meddle with Mr. Metz's orthography.

[graphic]
[graphic]

ABORIGINES OF THE EASTERN GHATS.

To the Secretary of the Bengal Asiatic Society.

SIR,—Pursuant to my purpose of submitting to the Society, upon a uniform plan and in successive series, samples of all the languages of the non-Arian races of India and of the adjacent countries, I have now the honour to transmit six more vocabularies, for which I am indebted to Mr. H. Newill, of the Madras Civil Service, at present employed in Vizagapatam. These six comprise the Kondh, Sávara, Gadaba, Yerukala, and Chentsu tongues. In forwarding them to me, Mr. Newill, a very good Telugu scholar, has noted by an annexed asterical mark such words of these tongues, and particularly of Yerukala, as coincide with Telugu. He has also remarked that many of the Chentsu vocables resemble the U'rdu.

Having, as you are aware, a purpose of submitting to the Society an analytical dissection of the whole of the vocabularies collected by me, I shall be sparing of remarks on the present occasion. But I may add to M. Newill's brief notes a few words, as follows:

The Chentsu tribe, whose language, as here exhibited, is almost entirely corrupt Hindi and U'rdu, with a few additions from Bengali, affords one more example to the many forthcoming of an uncultivated aboriginal race having abandoned their own tongue. Such relinquishment of the mother-tongue has been so general that throughout Hindustan Proper and the Western Himalaya, as well as throughout the whole of the vast Sub-Himalayan tract denominated the Tarai, not excluding the contiguous valley of Assam, there are but a few exceptions to this the general state of the case; whilst in the Central Himalaya the aboriginal tongues are daily giving way before the Khas language, which, though originally and still traceably Tartaric, has been yet more altered by Arian influences than even the cultivated Dravirian tongues. The very significant cause of this phenomenon it will be our business to explain by and by. In the meanwhile the fact is well deserving of

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