The Lives of the Most Eminent British Painters, Sculptors, and Architects, Volume 6

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Page 115 - A little neglect may breed great mischief; for want of a nail the shoe was lost; for want of a shoe the horse was lost; and for want of a horse the rider was lost,' being overtaken and slain by the enemy; all for want of a little care about a horseshoe nail.
Page 53 - There is not a man on earth who has the least notion of colouring : we all of us have it equally to seek for, and find out — as at - present, it is totally lost to the art.
Page 6 - not much unlike a monkey in the face," some wag, whom he had offended, stuck these Hnes on his door : — " When a man to a fair for a show brings a lion, 1' is usual a monkey the sign-post to tie on ; But here the old custom reversed is seen, For the lion's without and the monkey's within.
Page 123 - I fear you have offended his Royal Highness.' ' Madam,' said the painter, ' I am the offended party.' The next day, about noon, Mr. Northcote was alone, when a gentle tap was heard, the studio door opened, and in walked the Prince. ' Mr. Northcote,' he said, ' I am come to return your sister's umbrella ; I brought it myself, that I might have an opportunity of saying that yesterday I thoughtlessly took an unbecoming liberty with you, which you properly resented. I really am angry with myself, and...
Page 101 - ... they may be done) will not be swept away in the tide of time, like straws and weeds by the torrent ? No, the world can only keep in view the principal and most perfect productions of human ingenuity ; such works as Dryden's, Pope's, and a few others, that from their unity, their completeness, their polish, have the stamp of immortality upon them, and seem indestructible like an element of nature. There are few of these : I fear your friend Wordsworth is not one.
Page 235 - Sir Thomas had painted an excellent portrait of Mr. Croker, and he was still more successful with Miss Croker (Lady Barrow). Of this latter portrait, Allan Cunningham declares that " men stood before it in a half circle, admiring its loveliness, in the Exhibition.
Page 47 - when he was pointed out to me at a public meeting, where a great crowd was assembled ; I got as near to him as I could from the pressure of the people, to touch the skirt of his coat, which I did with great satisfaction to my mind.
Page 121 - ... Cooper, the American, was in Paris at the same time : his looks and manner seemed to announce a much greater man. He strutted through the streets with a very consequential air ; and in company held up his head, screwed up his features, and placed himself on a sort of pedestal to be observed and admired, as if he never relaxed in the assumption nor wished it to be forgotten by others, that he was the * American Sir Walter Scott. The real one never troubled himself about the matter.
Page 188 - The subject was, however, left a secret until the exhibition of 1797, when it was found to be Satan calling to his Legions. " Awake, arise, or be for ever fallen." The next year he exhibited Coriolanus at the hearth of Aufidius ; Rolla, Cato, and Hamlet, all followed in the train of Coriolanus.
Page 94 - but though Sir Joshua borrowed a great deal, he drew largely from himself; or rather, it was a strong and peculiar feeling of nature working in him and forcing its way out in spite of all impediments, and that made whatever he touched his own. In spite of his deficiency in drawing and his want of academic rules and a proper education, you see this breaking out like a devil in all his works.

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