What Must Be Forgotten: The Survival of Yiddish in Zionist Palestine

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Syracuse University Press, 2004 M11 1 - 262 pages
As Zionism took root in Palestine, European Yiddish was employed within a dominant Hebrew context. A complex relationship between cultural politics and Jewish writing ensued that paved the way for modern Israeli culture. This enlightening volume reveals a previously unrecognized, alternative literature that flourished vigorously without legitimacy. Significant examples discussed include ethnically ambiguous fiction of Zalmen Brokhes, minority-oriented works of Avrom Rivess, and culturally pluralistic poetry by Rikuda Potash. The remote locales of these writers, coupled with the exuberant expressiveness of Yiddish, led to unique perceptions of Zionist endeavors in the Yishuv. Using rare archival material and personal interviews, What Must Be Forgotten unearths dimensions largely neglected in mainstream books on Yiddish and/or Hebrew studies.
 

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Contents

Nationalism Zionism and the Formation of a National Narrative
1
Meeting Expectations? The Palestinian Fiction of Zalmen Brokhes
45
The Problematics of Language Wanderings
93
Outcasts Within The Yishuv Experience in the Fiction of Avrom Rivess
130
Writing as a Native The Canaanizing Poetry of Rikuda Potash
166
Epilogue
206
Glossary
211
References
213
Index
231
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