Y Cymmrodor: The Magazine of the Honourable Society of Cymmrodorion ...

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Cymmrodorion Society., 1887

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Page 80 - Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident; so strong indeed, that no philologer could examine them all three, without believing them to have sprung from some common source, which, perhaps, no longer exists...
Page 77 - Wouldst thou the young year's blossoms and the fruits of its decline, And all by which the soul is charmed, enraptured, feasted, fed, Wouldst thou the earth and heaven itself in one sole name combine ? I name thee, O Sakuntala,- and all at once is) said.
Page 80 - The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident; so strong indeed, that no philologer could examine them all three, without believing them to have sprung from some common source, which, perhaps, no longer exists...
Page 78 - He, whom the mind alone can perceive, whose essence eludes the external organs, who has no visible parts, who exists from eternity, even he, the soul of all beings, whom no being can comprehend, shone forth in person. He, having willed to produce various beings from his own divine substance, first with a thought created the waters, and placed in them a productive seed...
Page 72 - Thou, joy of all below, and all above, Mild Venus, queen of laughter, queen of love: Leave thy bright island, where on many a rose And many a pink thy blooming train repose; Assist me, goddess'. since a lovely pair Command my song, like thee divinely fair.
Page 65 - the most fastidious European reader will meet with numerous passages of exquisite beauty ; the narrative is generally very perspicuous, and some of the finest scenes in it are described with simplicity and elegance of diction.
Page 81 - The Court of Directors of the East India Company resolved, by an unanimous vote, that a monument should be erected to his memory in St. Paul's Cathedral, and that a statue of Sir William Jones should be prepared, at the expense of the Company, and sent out to Bengal, that it might be placed there in a suitable position. His works are his true monument. His epitaph, unlike other epitaphs, declared only the simple truth in affirming: " Quicquid autera utile vel honestum Consiliis, exemplo, auctoritate,...
Page 81 - ... grammar, than could have been produced by accident; so strong that no philologer could examine all the three without believing them to have sprung from some common source which perhaps no longer exists. There is a similar reason, though not quite so forcible, for supposing that both the Gothic and the Celtic, though blended with a different idiom, had the same origin with the Sanskrit.
Page 29 - let him not eat.' For knowing that lazy repose is the fomenter and mother of vices, he subjected the shoulders of the monks to divine labours ; for those who subject their heads and minds to indolent tranquility, generate an unstable spirit of wantonness and restless incitements to inordinate desires. Therefore, with hand and foot they work zealously at their tasks ; they lay the yoke upon their shoulders, with untiring arms they fix poles and stakes in the ground, with holy hands they carry saws...
Page 72 - He once imprison'd, all the conflict ends. The queens exulting near their consorts stand; Each bears a deadly falchion in her hand; Now here, now there, they bound with furious pride, And thin the trembling ranks from side to side; Swift as Camilla flying o'er the main, Or lightly skimming o'er the dewy plain : Fierce as they seem, some bold Plebeian spear May pierce their shield, or stop their full career.

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