The Antigone of Sophocles in Greek and English

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John W. Parker, 1848 - 31 pages
 

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Contents

I
v
II
xiii
III
5
IV
15
V
21
VI
35
VII
39
VIII
59
X
77
XI
79
XII
91
XIII
93
XIV
107
XV
109
XVI
119
XVII
131

IX
63

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Page 227 - The hand that writ it ; for I love you so That I in your sweet thoughts would be forgot If thinking on me then should make you woe. O, if, I say, you look upon this verse When I perhaps compounded am with clay, Do not so much as my poor name rehearse, But let your love even with my life decay, Lest the wise world should look into your moan And mock you with me after I am gone.
Page 196 - But love, first learned in a lady's eyes, Lives not alone immured in the brain; But with the motion of all elements, Courses as swift as thought in every power; And gives to every power a double power, Above their functions and their offices.
Page 166 - Man, that is born of a woman, hath but a short time to live, and is full of misery. He cometh up, and is cut down, like a flower ; he fleeth as it were a shadow, and never continueth in one stay.
Page 197 - I'll see their trial first : — Bring in the evidence. — Thou robed man of justice, take thy place ; — [To Edgar. And thou, his yoke-fellow of equity, [To the Fool. Bench by his side : — You are of the commission, Sit you too.
Page 45 - Twas they who ratified those other laws, And set their record in the human heart. Nor do I deem thy heraldings so mighty, That thou, a mortal man, couldst trample on The unwritten and unchanging laws of heaven. They are not of to-day, or yesterday, But ever live, and no one knows their birth-tide...
Page 163 - ... he would be bold with himself and say, when he preached twice a day at St. Giles...
Page 232 - The time is out of joint; — О cursed spite! That ever I was born to set it right ! Nay, come, let 's go together.
Page 165 - Haud minus .¿Eneas tortos legit obvius orbes, Vestigatque virum, et disjecta per agmina magna Voce vocat. Quoties oculos conjecit in hostem, Alipedumque fugam cursu tentavit equorum : Aversos toties currus Juturna retorsit.
Page ix - Lamb to an honoured friend of mine : that he had derived more pleasure from the meagre Latin versions of the Greek tragedians, than from any other versions of them he was acquainted with.

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