The Lady's Magazine, Or, Entertaining Companion for the Fair Sex, Appropriated Solely to Their Use and Amusement, Volume 35

Front Cover
Robinson and Roberts, 1804
 

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Contents

I
7
IV
8
V
9
VI
11
VIII
15
IX
19
XIII
26
XIV
27
CXLVII
347
CLII
354
CLIII
355
CLIV
360
CLV
372
CLVI
372
CLVII
375
CLVIII
377

XV
30
XVI
33
XVII
34
XVIII
35
XX
39
XXIV
45
XXV
48
XXVI
51
XXVII
54
XXVIII
56
XXX
56
XXXI
59
XXXII
63
XXXIII
66
XXXIV
67
XXXVII
68
XXXVIII
69
XXXIX
70
XL
83
XLIII
89
XLIV
99
XLVI
103
XLVII
107
XLVIII
110
XLIX
113
LI
114
LII
117
LIII
121
LIV
123
LVI
131
LVII
132
LX
135
LXI
136
LXII
148
LXIII
150
LXV
151
LXVI
151
LXVII
151
LXVIII
155
LXIX
156
LXX
158
LXXI
159
LXXII
163
LXXIII
166
LXXIV
169
LXXVI
170
LXXVII
173
LXXVIII
176
LXXIX
179
LXXXII
191
LXXXIII
196
LXXXIV
197
LXXXV
198
XC
206
XCII
208
XCIII
211
XCIV
214
XCV
219
XCVI
222
XCVII
225
XCVIII
226
XCIX
229
C
233
CI
233
CII
244
CIII
246
CIV
248
CV
248
CVIII
256
CIX
258
CX
261
CXI
262
CXII
263
CXIV
269
CXV
272
CXVI
275
CXVII
278
CXVIII
280
CXX
280
CXXI
285
CXXIV
289
CXXV
291
CXXVII
298
CXXVIII
300
CXXIX
302
CXXX
303
CXXXI
308
CXXXII
319
CXXXIII
321
CXXXV
325
CXXXVI
326
CXXXVII
327
CXXXVIII
328
CXXXIX
331
CXL
334
CXLI
337
CXLIII
338
CXLIV
341
CXLV
341
CXLVI
342
CLXI
384
CLXII
387
CLXIII
390
CLXIV
393
CLXVI
394
CLXVII
397
CLXVIII
398
CLXIX
399
CLXX
403
CLXXIV
410
CLXXV
411
CLXXVI
414
CLXXVII
419
CLXXVIII
421
CLXXIX
424
CLXXX
425
CLXXXII
432
CLXXXIII
436
CLXXXV
439
CLXXXVI
440
CLXXXVIII
440
CLXXXIX
443
CXC
446
CXCI
449
CXCIII
450
CXCIV
453
CXCV
454
CXCVI
459
CCI
467
CCII
468
CCIII
470
CCIV
471
CCV
485
CCVI
491
CCVII
495
CCVIII
496
CCIX
499
CCX
502
CCXI
505
CCXIII
506
CCXIV
508
CCXV
512
CCXVI
515
CCXIX
523
CCXX
526
CCXXII
535
CCXXIII
539
CCXXV
543
CCXXVI
547
CCXXVII
548
CCXXIX
550
CCXXX
555
CCXXXI
558
CCXXXII
560
CCXXXIII
560
CCXXXIV
565
CCXXXVIII
566
CCXXXIX
568
CCXL
571
CCXLV
580
CCXLVI
588
CCXLVII
589
CCXLVIII
598
CCXLIX
600
CCL
602
CCLI
605
CCLII
606
CCLIII
607
CCLIV
611
CCLV
614
CCLVI
616
CCLVII
616
CCLVIII
621
CCLXI
622
CCLXII
623
CCLXIII
627
CCLXIV
640
CCLXV
647
CCLXVI
653
CCLXVII
656
CCLXVIII
667
CCLXIX
670
CCLXX
673
CCLXXI
674
CCLXXII
677
CCLXXIII
680
CCLXXIV
681
CCLXXV
682
CCLXXVI
683
CCLXXIX
692
CCLXXX
696
CCLXXXI
701
CCLXXXII
707
CCLXXXIII
708
CCLXXXIV
711
CCLXXXVI
715
CCLXXXVII
716
CCLXXXVIII
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Page 548 - He loved them both, but both in vain, Nor him beheld, nor her, again. Not long beneath the whelming brine, Expert to swim, he lay; Nor soon he felt his strength decline Or courage die away; But waged with death a lasting strife, Supported by despair of life.
Page 548 - Could catch the sound no more: For then, by toil subdued, he drank The stifling wave, and then he sank. No poet wept him; but the page Of narrative sincere, That tells his name, his worth, his age, Is wet with Anson's tear : And tears by bards or heroes shed Alike immortalize the dead. I therefore purpose not, or dream, Descanting on his fate, To give the melancholy theme A more enduring date : But misery still delights to trace Its semblance in another's case.
Page 243 - Next Anger rush'd, his eyes on fire, In lightnings own'd his secret stings, In one rude clash he struck the lyre, And swept with hurried hand the strings.
Page 691 - Walking in the beautiful gardens of those friends, with whom you have dined, would be the choice of men of sense ; yours is to be fixed down to chess, where you are found engaged for two or three hours ! This is your perpetual recreation, which is the least eligible of any for a sedentary man, because, instead of accelerating the motion of the fluids, the rigid attention it requires helps to retard the circulation and obstruct internal secretions.
Page 548 - That pitiless perforce, They left their outcast mate behind, And scudded still before the wind. Some succour yet they could afford ; And, such as storms allow, The cask, the coop, the floated cord, Delay 'd not to bestow.
Page 692 - That, of all imaginable exercises, is the most slight and insignificant, if you allude to the motion of a carriage suspended on springs. By observing the degree of heat obtained by different kinds of motion, we may form an estimate of the quantity of exercise given by each. Thus, for example, if you turn out to walk in winter with cold feet, in an hour's time you will be in a glow all over ; ride on horseback, the same effect will scarcely be perceived by four hours...
Page 406 - What will it profit you if you gain the whole world and lose your own soul...
Page 691 - ... this wretched game, you destroy your constitution. What can be expected from such a course of living, but a body replete with stagnant...
Page 372 - ... will never be politeness : that must be easy, natural, unstudied, manly, noble. And what will give this, but a mind benevolent, and perpetually attentive to exert that amiable disposition in trifles towards all you converse and live with? Benevolence in greater matters takes a higher name, and is the queen of virtues. Nothing is so incompatible with politeness as any trick of absence of mind. I would...
Page 293 - How poor, how rich, how abject, how august, How complicate, how wonderful, is man!

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