The Beauties of England and Wales, Or, Delineations, Topographical, Historical, and Descriptive, of Each County, Volume 12, Issue 2

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Page 444 - ... college situated in a purer air ; so that his house was a university in a less volume ; whither they came not so much for repose as study ; and to examine and refine those grosser propositions, which laziness and consent made current in vulgar conversation.
Page 266 - And wisdom's self Oft seeks to sweet retired solitude, Where, with her best nurse, contemplation, She plumes her feathers, and lets grow her wings, That in the various bustle of resort Were all too ruffled, and sometimes impaired. He that has light within his own clear breast May sit i...
Page 268 - My love, my life, said I, explain This change of humour : pr'ythee, tell : That falling tear — What does it mean ? She sigh'd ; she smil'd : and to the flowers Pointing, the lovely moralist said : See, friend, in some few fleeting hours, See yonder, what a change is made. Ah me! the blooming pride of May, And that of beauty are but one: At morn both flourish bright and gay, Both fade at evening, pale, and gone; At dawn poor Stella...
Page 122 - English, surrendered to the use of himself for life, and after to the use of his eldest son and his...
Page 49 - The king started a little, and said : ' By my faith, my lord, I thank you for your good cheer, but I may not endure to have my laws broken in my sight. My attorney must speak with you.
Page 430 - Immediately there was heard so loud a crack, as if heaven had split asunder; every one was now solicitous for the safety of his neighbour, and called to one another throughout the field : No answer being...
Page 344 - And one of the prisoners who had been taken in the action said, 'that he was confident Mr. Hambden was hurt, for he saw him ride off the field before the action was done, which he never used to do, and with his head hanging down, and resting his hands upon the neck of his horse;' by which he concluded he was hurt.
Page 176 - The Master, Fellows, and Scholars of the College of Pembroke, in the University of Oxford, of the foundation of king James, at the cost and charges of Thomas Tesdale and Richard Wightwick...
Page 430 - ... safety, called to one another: those that were nearest our lovers, hearing no answer, stepped to the place where they lay: they first saw a little smoke, and after, this faithful pair - John with one arm about his Sarah's neck, and the other held over her face, as if to screen her from the lightning. They were struck dead, and already grown stiff and cold in this tender posture. There was no mark or discolouring on their bodies, only that Sarah's eyebrow was a little singed, and a small spot...
Page 93 - Westminster, forming a new catechism, and scheme of religion,) ever ventured to make any answer to it; nor is it indeed to be answered, but must remain to the world's end, as a monument of the learning, courage, and loyalty, of that excellent place, against the highest malice and tyranny that was ever exercised in or over any nation...

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