Transactions of the Geological Society

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Geological Society of London, 1829
 

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Page 126 - From the fact of these tertiary outliers Dr. Buckland inferred, ' that the basins of London and Hants were originally united together in one continuous deposit across the now intervening chalk of Salisbury Plain in Wilts, and the plains of Andover and Basingstoke in Hants...
Page 377 - Geological Account of a Series of Animal and Vegetable Remains and of Rocks, collected by J. Crawfurd, Esq. on a Voyage up the Irawadi to Ava, in 1826 and 1827.
Page 378 - I quoted the opinion of Mr. Weaver on the importance of instituting a comparison between the organic remains which might be discovered in the diluvium of tropical countries, and the similar remains found in the diluvium of the temperate and frigid zones of the northern hemisphere...
Page 379 - ... through which they sink wells about two hundred feet to collect petroleum. In examining the bones, I have had the advantage of the co-operation of Mr. Clift, to whose anatomical description I beg to refer my readers. And though we are still without proof as to the existence of fossil elephants in Asia, there being no remains of these animals in the collection now before us ; we have bones and teeth of the Pachydermata which are usually associated with them in Europe, America, and Siberia; viz....
Page 128 - ... with the bones and horns of oxen, red -deer, roebucks, horses, wild boars, and beavers. A human skull, of high antiquity, has also been found in it, at a depth of many feet, at the contact of the peat with a substratum of shell-marl. It was accompanied by rude instruments of stone. Along the northern edge of this peat-bog, there is a considerable deposit of marl, mixed with calcareous tufa from two to ten feet in thickness, and frequently interstratified with beds of peat, varying from six inches...
Page 391 - The pioneers were ordered to remove a house, which would have interfered with the defence of a stockade if the enemy had assailed it. Upon endeavouring to cut down the massive teak pillars on which it was raised, they found that the edges of their hatchets were all turned. On examining into the cause of this, they found that the pillars were petrified throughout, though the house had only been built ten years ; and the pillars were under water three months in the year during the monsoon.
Page 427 - Antediluvian Phytology, illustrated by a Collection of the FOSSIL REMAINS OF PLANTS, peculiar to the Coal Formations of Great Britain...
Page 431 - Some Account of the Science of Botany ; being the Substance of an Introductory Lecture...

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