A Familiar History of Birds: Their Nature, Habits, and Instincts, Volume 2

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John W. Parker, 1835
 

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Page 109 - And there went forth a wind from the LORD, and brought quails from the sea, and let them fall by the camp, as it were a day's journey on this side, and as it were a day's journey on the other side, round about the camp, and as it were two cubits high upon the face of the earth.
Page 260 - Come on, sir; here's the place: — stand still. — How fearful And dizzy 'tis, to cast one's eyes so low! The crows and choughs, that wing the midway air, Show scarce so gross as beetles : Half way down Hangs one that gathers samphire; dreadful trade! Methinks, he seems no bigger than his head: The fishermen, that walk upon the beach, Appear like mice; and yon...
Page 182 - ... the legs of the bird hanging out ; and as it groweth greater, it openeth the shell by degrees, till at length it is all come forth, and hangeth only by the bill...
Page 131 - Yea, the stork in the heaven knoweth her appointed times; and the turtle and the crane and the swallow observe the time of their coming; but my people know not the judgment of the Lord.
Page 181 - Muskles are -. the other end is made fast unto the belly of a rude masse or lumpe, which in time commeth to the shape and form of a bird : when it is perfectly formed, the shell gapeth open, and the first thing that appeareth is the...
Page 112 - The tongue of the sucking child cleaveth to the roof of his mouth for thirst : the young children ask bread, and no man breaketh it unto them.
Page 181 - There is a small island in Lancashire, called the Pile of Foulders, wherein are found the broken pieces of old and bruised ships, some whereof have been cast thither by...
Page 182 - Lancashire call by no other name than a tree-goose, which place aforesaid, and all those parts adjoining, do so much abound therewith, that one of the best is bought for three pence. For the truth hereof, if any doubt, may it please them to repair unto me, and I shall satisfie them by the testimonie of good witnesses.
Page 164 - Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools, and changed the glory of the uncorruptible God into an image made like to corruptible man, and to birds, and fourfooted beasts, and creeping things.

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