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" By poetry we mean the art of employing words in such a manner as to produce an illusion on the imagination, the art of doing by means of words what the painter does by means of colors. "
Critical and historical essays - Page 4
by Thomas Babington Macaulay (baron [essays]) - 1883
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An Essay on the Influence of Poetry on the Mind

J. Hemming Webb - 1839 - 86 pages
...of fiction, whether penned in prosaic or versified diction. An able Reviewer* has described it to be the art of employing words in such a manner as to...the art of doing by means of words, what the painter does by means of colour. Dr. Johnson has defined it to be " the art of uniting pleasure with truth,...
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Critical and Miscellaneous Essays, Volume 1

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - 1840
...anything which gives so much pleasure ought to be called unsoundness. By poetry we mean, not of course all writing in verse, nor even all good writing in...the art of doing by means of words what the painter does by means of colors. Thus the greatest of poets has described it, in lines universally admired...
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An Essay on the Character of the Welsh as a Nation, in the Present Age

William Jones - 1841 - 167 pages
...pleasure ought to be called unsoundness. By poetry we mean, not of course all writing in verse, nor even good writing in verse. Our definition excludes many...the art of doing by means of words, what the painter does by means of colours. Thus the greatest of poets has described it, in lines universally admired...
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An essay on the character of the Welsh as a nation

William Jones - 1841
...pleasure ought to be called unsoundness. By poetry we mean, not of course all writing in verse, nor even good writing in verse. Our definition excludes many...the art of doing by means of words, what the painter does by means of colours. Thus the greatest of poets has described it, in lines universally admired...
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Essays, Critical and Miscellaneous

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - 1846 - 758 pages
...unsoandness. By poetry we mean, not of course all writing in yerse, nor even all good writing in verse. Onr ~ does by means of colours. Thus the greatest of poets has described it, in lines universally admired...
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The Modern British Essayists: Macaulay, T.B. Essays

1852
...thing which gives so much pleasure ought to be called unsoundness. By poetry we mean, not of course il and military affairs a coolness of judgment and...which some writers have thought inconsistent with does by means of colours. Thus the greatest of poets has described it, in lines universally admired...
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Critical and Historical Essays: Contributed to the Edinburgh Review, Volume 1

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - 1853
...unsoundness of mind, if any thing which gives so much pleasure ought to be called unsoundness. By poetry wo mean not all writing in verse, nor even all good writing...other grounds, deserve the highest praise. By poetry wo mean the art of employing words in such a manner as to produce an illusion on the imagination, the...
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Bentley's Monthly Review, Or, Literary Argus, Volume 2

1854
...unsoundiiess of mind, if anything which gives so much pleasure ought to be called unsoundiiess. By poetry we mean not all writing in verse, nor even...the art of employing words in such a manner as to pioduce an illusion on the imagination, the art of doing by means of words what the painter does l>y...
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Essays, Critical and Miscellaneous

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - 1856 - 744 pages
...thing which gives so much pleasure ought to be called unsounduess. By poetry we mean, not of course all writing in verse, nor even all good writing in...the art of doing by means of words what the painter does by means of colours. Thus the greatest of poets has described it, in lines universally admired...
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Essays, Critical and Miscellaneous

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - 1858 - 744 pages
...thing which gives so much pleasure ought to be called unsoundness. By poetry we mean, not of course the governors, will be fixed by the force of the governed....of spies ; they may hang scores of the disaffected does by means of colours. Thus the greatest of poets has described it, in lines universally admired...
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