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" The Puritans were men whose minds had derived a peculiar character from the daily contemplation of superior beings and eternal interests. Not content with acknowledging, in general terms, an overruling Providence, they habitually ascribed every event... "
Critical and historical essays - Page 21
by Thomas Babington Macaulay (baron [essays]) - 1883
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The Christian Observer, Volume 31

1832
...eloquence, that though you must have read it before I shall not stint you with a meagre extract. — " The Puritans were men whose minds had derived a peculiar...habitually ascribed every event to the will of the Great Being for whose power nothing was too vast, for whose inspection nothing was too minute. To know Him,...
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The baptist Magazine

1825
...Yours truly, W. И. ANGAS. Character of the Puritans. [Extracted from the Edinburgh. Rtvieic, No. 84.] THE Puritans were men whose minds had derived a peculiar...Not content with acknowledging, in general terms, an over-rnlinc Providence, they habitually ascribed every event to the will of the Great Being, for whose...
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The Baptist Magazine, Volume 17

1825
...were men »hose minds had derived a pi-culiar character from the d.-iily contemplation of snperior beings, and eternal interests. Not content with acknowledging,...habitually ascribed every event to the will of the Great Being, for whose power nothing was too vast. for u hose inspection nothing was too miuutc. To know...
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The Christian Advocate, Volume 4

1826
...that all their actions were defensible, or all their opinions without error. The reviewers say — "The Puritans were men whose minds had derived a peculiar...habitually ascribed every event to the will of the Great Being, for whose power nothing was too vast, for whose inspection nothing was too minute. To know him,...
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The Ant, publ. during 1826 and 1827, Volume 2

Ant The - 1827
...married her. Marriage usually puts an end to imagination. But it was not so with mine. THE PURITANS. THE Puritans were men whose minds had derived a peculiar...habitually ascribed every event to the will of the Great Being, for whose power nothing was too vast, for whose inspection nothing was too minute. To know him,...
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Analysis of the Principles of Rhetorical Delivery as Applied in Reading and ...

Ebenezer Porter - 1828 - 404 pages
...not a limit —to judgments which will make you desolate. 108. Character of the Puritans. Beecher. The Puritans were men whose minds had derived a peculiar...with acknowledging, in general terms, an overruling Prov5 idence, they habitually ascribed every event to the will of the Great Being, for whose power...
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A Practical System of Rhetoric: Or, The Principles and Rules of Style ...

Samuel Phillips Newman - 1829 - 252 pages
..." The Puritans were men whose minds had derived a peculiar character from the daily contemplations of superior beings and eternal interests. Not content...habitually ascribed every event to the will of the Great Being, for whose power nothing was too vast, for whose inspection nothing was too minute. To know him,...
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Analysis of the Principles of Rhetorical Delivery: As Applied to Reading and ...

Ebenezer Porter - 1830 - 404 pages
...— to judgments which will make you desolate. Beechcr. 108. Character of the Puritans. The purtians were men whose minds had derived a peculiar character...with acknowledging, in general terms, an overruling Prov5 idence, they habitually ascribed every event to the will of the Great Being, for whose power...
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The Biblical repositor (and quarterly observer) [afterw.] The American ...

Edward Robinson - 1848
...who were the Puritans? Let me answer in the language of Britain's most eloquent modern essayist : v " The Puritans were men whose minds had derived a peculiar...habitually ascribed every event to the will of the Great Being, for whose power nothing is too vast, for whose inspection nothing is too minute. To know Him,...
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The English Orator: a Selection of Pieces for Reading & Recitation

James Hedderwick - 1833 - 216 pages
...sea, And the stupendous anthem which is beat For ever on its shores. And he moved on. .THE PURITANS. THE Puritans were men whose minds had derived a peculiar...habitually ascribed every event to the will of the Great Being, for whose power nothing was too vast, for whose inspection nothing was too minute. To know him,...
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