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" No man ever spoke more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what he uttered. No member of his speech but consisted of his own graces. His hearers could not cough or look aside from him without loss. He commanded... "
Critical and historical essays - Page 351
by Thomas Babington Macaulay (baron [essays]) - 1883
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A Catalogue of the Royal and Noble Authors of England, Scotland ..., Volume 2

Horace Walpole - 1806
...idleness in what he utter'd. His hearers could not cough, or looke aside from him, without losse. He commanded where he spoke, and had his judges angry...no man had their affections more in his power. The feare of every man that heard him was, lest he should make an end8." This character is from Ben Jonson's...
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The Beauties of England and Wales: Or, Delineations ..., Volume 7, Part 1

John Britton - 1808
...idelness, in what he uttered. His bearers could not cough, or looke aside from him without losse. He commanded where he spoke, and had his judges angry...no man had their affections more in his power. The feare of every man that hearde him was, lest he should make an end." Another very fine portrait of...
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Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Sir Philip Sidney

Thomas Zouch - 1809 - 400 pages
...cough or look aside " froin him without loss. He commanded where he spoke : and had his"judges angry or pleased at his devotion. No man had their affections...that heard him was lest he " should make an end." See Ben Jensen's Discoveries. The author of this book is to be distinguished from Sir Thomas Pope Blount,...
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Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Sir Philip Sidney

Thomas Zouch - 1809 - 400 pages
...cough or look aside " from him withost loss. He commanded where he spoke : and had his "judges angry or pleased at his devotion. No man had their affections...fear of every man that heard him was lest he " should mafce an ead.'r See Sen Jcwotfs Discoveries* The author of this book is to be distinguished from Sir...
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The Works of Ben Jonson...: With Notes Critical and Explanatory ..., Volume 9

Ben Jonson, William Gifford - 1816
...consisted of his own graces. His hearers could not cough, or look aside from him, without loss. He commanded where he spoke ; and had his judges angry...man that heard him was, lest he should make an end. Scriptorum Catalogus* — Cicero is said to be the only wit that the people of Rome had equalled to...
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The Essays Or Counsels, Moral, Economical and Political: With Elegant ...

Francis Bacon - 1818 - 290 pages
...bat consisted of the own graces. His hearers could not cough or look aside from him without loss. He commanded, where he spoke; and had his judges angry...man that heard him, was, lest he should make an end. Lord Egerton, the Chancellor, a great and grave orator, 8cc. But his learned and able (though unfortunate)...
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The essays; or, Counsels moral, economical, and political, by sir F. Bacon

Francis Bacon (visct. St. Albans.) - 1818
...but consisted of the own graces. His hearers could not cough or look aside from him without loss. He commanded, where he spoke ; and had his judges angry...man that heard him, was, lest he should make an end. Lord Egerton, the Chancellor, a great and grave orator, 8cc. But his learned and able (though nnfortunatn)...
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The Works of Francis Bacon: Lord Chancellor of England, Volume 16

Francis Bacon - 1834
...but consisted of his own graces. His hearers could not cough or look aside from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke, and had his judges angry...man that heard him was lest he should make an end." As a Patron, he considered preferment a sacred trust, to preserve and promote high feeling, encourage...
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The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England: A New Edition:

Francis Bacon, Basil Montagu - 1827
...but consisted of his own graces. His hearers could not cough, or look aside from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke; and had his judges angry...man that heard him was lest he should make an end. (/) Take for instance any of the Nervous Aphorisms, in the Novum Organum, and compare it with the sentences...
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The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England, Volume 7

Francis Bacon, Basil Montagu - 1827
...but consisted of his own graces. His hearers could not cough, or look aside from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke; and had his judges angry...man that heard him was lest he should make an end. (f) Take for instance any of the Nervous Aphorisms, in the Novum Organum, and compare it with the sentences...
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