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(Junte, ration and expense of each mode of culture be nature and condition of the land on which the fully described; and that proper certificates of experiments are made, together with an account the nature and condition of the land on which of the produce, the weight per Winchester the experiments are made, together with an ac- bushel, and a sample of not less than a quart, count of the produce of the corn, the weight be produced to the Society on or before the per bushel, and also of the straw, be produced first Tuesday in December, 1803. It is apto the Society on or beforc the first Tuesday in prehended that, if a bean should be brought February, 1804.

into cultivation with the habits of the hotspur, 34. SPRING WHEAT. To the person who, or other early peas, that it would, in a great between the 10th of January and the 10th of measure, escape the danger arising from the April, 1803, shall cultivate the greatest quan- collier-insect, or other insects, and allow more tity of wheat, not less than ten acres; the sil- time for the farmers to till the land for the sub. ver medal, or twenty guineas. It is required sequent crop of wheat. The accounts and certhat the time of sowing and reaping be noticed; tificates to be delivered on or before the first also a particular account of the species, cultiva- Tuesday in December, 1903. tion, and expense attending it, with proper cer- 37. The same premium is extended one year tificates of the nature and condition of the land farther. The accounts and certificates to be deon which the experiments were made, and the livered on or before the first Tuesday in Dec. name of the crop, if any, which the same land 1804. bore the preceding year; together with an ac- 38. COMPARATIVE CULTURE OF TURcount of the produce, the weight per Winches- For the best set of experiments made ter bushel; and a sample, not less than a quart, on not less than eight acres of land, four of be produced to the Society on or before the se- which to be sown broad-cast, and four-drilled, to cond Tuesday in February, 1804.

ascertain whether it is most advantageous to It is supposed that sowing wheat early in the cultivate turnips by sowing them broad-cast spring will not only allow more time to till the and hand-hoeing them, or by drilling them in land but less for the growth of weeds; thus equi-distant rows, and hand or horse-hoeing rendering the wheat as clean as a barley crop, the intervals; the silver medal, or twenty guiand exhausting the soil much less than au- neas. It is required that every operation and tumnal sowing. It may be seen in the 19th expense of each mode of culture be fully devolume that the wheat usually sown in autumn scribed, and that proper certificates of the namay be put into the ground, with great success, ture and condition of the land, on which the so late as February or March, thus giving time experiments were made, together with the to clear the ground from turnips, or to avoid a weight of the turnips grown, on a fair average bad season.

sixteen perches of land, under each mode of 35. BEANS AND WHEAT. To the person culture, be produced to the Society on or bewho shall have dibbled or drilled, between the fore the first Tuesday in March, 1804. The 1st of December, 1802, and the 1st of April, object which the Society have in view in offer1803, the greatest quantity of land, not lessing this premium is experimentally to ascertain than ten acres, with beans, in equi-distant rows, the most advantageous method of growing turand hoed the intervals iwice or oftener, and nips. To do this in a satisfactory manner, both shall have sown the same land with wheat in the drilled and broad-cast crops should have the autumn of the year 1803; the silver me. the advantage of the most perfect cultivation, dal, or twenty guineas. It is required that an consequently the drilled crops should have the account of the sort and quantity of beans, the intervals between the rows worked by the horse time of dibbling or drilling, and of reaping or or hand-hoe, or by both these implements; and mowing them, the produce per acre thrashed, the rows should be either weeded or hand-hoed, the expense of dibbling or drilling, hand or or both weeded and hand-hoed. The broad. borse hoeing, the distance of the rows, and the cast crop should have every advantage which quality of the soil, together with certificates of weeding and hand-hoeing can give it, consisthe number of acres, and that the land was tently with leaving the soil a flat sursace. afterwards actually sown with wheat, be pro- 39. The same premium is extended one duced on or before the second Tuesday in year farther. Certificates to be produced on or March, 1804.

before the first Tuesday in March, 1805. 36. Beans. To the person who, in the 40. PARSNIPS. To the person who. in the year 1802, shall discover and cultivate, either year 1803, shall cultivate the greatest quantity by the drill or dibbling-method, on not less of land, not less than five acres, with parsnips, than five acres, a species of horse-beans or tick- for the sole purpose of feeding cattle or sheep ; beans, that will ripen their seeds before the the gold medal, or thirty guineas. Certificates 21st of August; the silver medal, or twenty • of the quantity of land so cultivated, with a par: guineas. It is required that a particular ac- ticular account of the nature of the soil and couot of the bean, the cultivation, and the ex- weight of the produce on sixteen perches, and pense attending it, with proper certificates of the also of the condition of the cattle or sheep fed

with the parsnips, and the advantages resulting It is required that every operation and expense from the practice, to be produced to the Soci- be fully described, and that satisfactory certifia ely on or before the second day in Nov. 1804. cates of the nature and condition of the soil on

41. Buck Wheat. To the person who which the crops have grown, together with an shall.cultivate the greatest quantity of land with account of their appearance, the number of buck wheat, not less than thirty acres; the horses and cattle, sheep or hogs, fed by the two gold medal. It is required that the time of green crops, and, as near as possible, the imsowing and reaping be noticed, also a particu. proved value of the live stock by the consumplar account of the species, cultivation, and ex- tion of those crops, and also the quantity of pense attending it, the manner of reaping it, wheat per acre, and its weight per bushel, be thrashing it, and housing the grain, with proper produced to the Society on or before the first rertificates of the nature and condition of the day of November, 1804. land on which the experiments were made, It is presumed that very great advantages and the name of the crop, if any, which the will arise to such agriculturists as shall adopt same land bore the preceding year, together this rotation of crops on a dry soil. They will with an account of the produce, and a sample be enabled, with the addition of a few acres of of the seed, not less than a quart, be produced turnip-rooted cabbage for spring-food, to keep to the Society on or before the second Tuesday such large Aocks of sheep and herds of neat in January, 1804

cattle as may secure a sufficient quantity of 42 Fur the next greatest quantity, not less manure to fertilize their land in the highest dethan filteen acies, on similar conditions; the gree, and in every situation. It is farther con. silver medal. Information respecting its ap- ceived that wheats which will bear sowing in plication to the feeding of cattle, hogs, and the spring will be particularly suitable for this poultry, and other of its uses, is also desired. premium. It is known to be particularly serviceable in 48, 49, 50. The same premiums are extend, furnishing honey to becs.

ed one year farther. Certificates to be deli43. RAISING GRASS SEEDS. To the per- vered on or before the first day of November, son who shall raise the greatest quantity of each 1805. or any of the following named grass seeds, viz. 51. PRESERVING TURNIPS. To the per-Meadow fox-tail (alopecurus pratensis,) son who shall discover to the Society the best sweet scented vernal grass (anthoxanthum odo. and cheapest method of preserving turnips per. ratum), Timothy grass, meadow Fescue grass, fectly sound, and in every respect fit for the smooth-stalked meadow grass (poa pratensis) purpose of supporting and fattening sheep and rough-stalked meadow grass (poa trivialis); neat cattle, during the months of February, the silver medal, or ten guineas. It is required March, and April; the gold medal, or thirty that certificates from persons who have viewed guineas. It is required that a full and accuthem in a proper state, to identify that they rate account of the method employed, and the are one or other of the seeds above-mentioned, expense attending the process, together with indicating clearly the particular species, and certificates that the produce of four acres at the noticing the quantity produced of such seeds, least have been preserved according to the mefree from weeds or mixture of other grasses, thod described, and applied to the feeding of together with proper samples of the seeds, be sheep and neat cattle; that the whole were produced to the Society on or before the first drawn out of the ground before the first day of day of February, 1804.

February, in order to clear the greater part of 44. The same premium is extended one il previous to its being prepared for corn, and year farther. Certificates to be produced on or to save the soil from being exhausted by the before the first day of February, 1805. turnips; and also of the weight of an average

45. ROTATION OF CROPs. To the person sixteen perches of the crop ; Le produced to the who shall, between the 10th of August, 1801, Society on or before the first Tuesday in Noand the 10th of September, 1803, cultivate the vember, 1804. greatest quantity of land, not less than forly N. B. It is recommended to those who may be acres, in the following rotation, viz.-1st, wina induced to try the necessary experiments for obter-tares; 2d, turnips; and 3d, wheat; and taining this and the following four premiums to apply the two former crops, in the best and consider the method employed for the preservation most farmer-like manner, to the rearing, sup- of potatoes in ridges, (which the growers call pies,/ porting, and fattening horses, cattle, sheep, or and also the propriety of adopting a similar mehogs, on the land which produced the crops; thod in cuses where they are previously frozen. It the gold medal, or one hundred guineas. is supposed that, in the latter instance, the addi.

46. For the next in quantity and merit, on tion of ie or snow, and the construction of the not less than thirty acres; the silver medal, or ridges upon a large scale, muy be sufficient to fifty guineas.

preserve the freezing temperature till the vegetables 47. For the next in quantity and merit, on are wanted for the use of cattle or sheep, at which pot less than twenty acres; the silver medal. time they may be thawe? by immersion in cold

THER

THE

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water, and the rot which a sudden thaw pro- samples; to be produced on or before the first duces may be prevented.

Tuesday in January, 1804. 52. For the next in quantity and merit, on 58. HARVESTING CORN IN WET WEAnot less than two acres, the silver medal, or

To the person who shall discover to fifteen guineas.

the Society the best and cheapest method, su53. PRESERVING CABBAGES. To the perior to any hitherto practised, of harvesting person who shall discover to the Society the corn in wet weather; the gold medal, or thirty best and cheapest method of preserving drum guineas. A full account of the method emheaded cabbages perfectly sound, and in every ployed, and of the expense attending the prorespect fit for the purpose of supporting and cess, with not less than two sheaves of the corn, fattening sheep and neat cattle during the and certificates that at least the produce of ten months of February, March, and April; the acres has been harvested according to the mnegold medal, or thirty guincas.

thod described, and that the whole is of equal 54. For the next in quantity and merit, on quality with the samples, to be produced on or not less than two acres, the silver medal or before the first Tuesday in January, 1804. fifteen guineas. Conditions the same as for 59. ASCERTAINING preserving turnips, Cl. 51. And the accounts PARTS OF ARABLE LAND. To the person to be produced on or before the first Tuesday who shall produce to the Society the most sain November, 1804.

tisfactory set of experiments to ascertain the 55. PRESERVING CARROTS, PARSNIPS, due proportion of the several component parts OR BEETS. To the person who shall discover of rich arable land, in one or more counties in to the Society the best and cheapest method of Great Britain, by an accurate analysis of it; preserving carrots, parsnips, or beers, perfectly and who having made a like analysis of some sound, and in every respect fit for the purpose poor arable land, shall, by comparing the comof supporting horses, and fattening sheep and ponent parts of each, and thereby ascertaining peat cattle, during the months of February, the deficiencies of the poor soil, improve a March, and April; the silver medal, or fifteen quantity of it, nor less than one acre, by the guineas. Conditions the same as for preserving addition of such parts as the former experiturnips, Cl. 51. and the accounts to be delivered ments shall have discovered to be wanting in on or before the first day in November, 1804. therein, and therefore probably the cause of its

56. PRESERVINO POTATOES. To the sterility; the gold medal, or forty guincas. It person who shall discover to the Society the is required that the manurings, ploughings, and best and cheapest method of preserving pota- crops, of the improved land, be the same after toes, two or more years, perfectly sound, with the improvement as before; and that a minute out vegetating, and in every other respect fit account of the produce in each state, of the for the purpose of sets and the use of the table, weather, and of the various influencing circumand, consequently, of supporting and fattening stances, together with the method made use of cattle; the silver medal, or twenty guincas. in analysing the suils, be produced, with proIt is required, that a full and accurate account per certificates and the chemical results of the of the method employed, and the expense at analysis, which are to remain the property of tending the prucess, with certificates that one the society, on or before the last Tuesday in hundred bushels at the- least have been pre- February, 1804. served according to the method described, and It is expected that a quantity, not less than that one or more bushels of the same potatoes six pounds, of the richi, of the poor, and of have been set, and produced a crop without the improved soils, be produced with the cere any apparent diminution of their vegetative rificates. power; and also that they have been used at 60. GAINING LAND FROM THE SEA. TO table, with entire satisfaction to the person who the person who shall produce to the Society an eat of them, together with a sample of one account, verified by actual experiment, of his hushel, be sent to the Society on or before the having gained the greatest quantity of land first Tuesday in November, 1804.

from the sea, not less than fifry acres, on the *57. MAKING MEADOW-HAY IN coast of Great Britain or Ireland; the gold ineWEATHER. To the person who shall disco. dal. Certificates of the quantity of land, and ver to the Society the best and cheapest me. that the cxperiments were begun after the ist thod, superior to any hitherto practised, of of January, 1797, to be produced to the Soci. making meadow-hay in wet weather; the gold eiy" on or before the last Tuesday in October, medal, or thirty guincas. A full account of 1803. the method employed, and of the expense at- 6). The same premium is extended one tending the process, with not less than fifty- year farther. Certificates to be produced on or six pounds of the bay ; and certificates that at before the last Tuesday in October, 1804. least the produce of six acres of land has been 62. The same premium is extended one made according to the method described, and year farther. Certificates to be produced on that the whole is of equal quality with the or before the last Tuesday in October, 1805.

1

WET

63,"IMPROVING LAND LYING WASTE. known, or in use for such purpose, and to be For the most satisfactory account of the best worked by not more than one man and two method of improving any of the following horses, the silver medal, or twenty guineas. soils, being land lying waste or uncultivated, The machine and certificates that at least viz. clay, gravel, sand, chalk, peat-earth and three acres have been pared by it in a proper bog, verificd by experiments on not less than manner, to be produced to the Society on or fifty acres of land; the gold medal, or thirty before the ist of January, 1804. guineas.

70. MACHINE FOR DIBBLING WHEAT. 64. For the next greatest quantity, not less To the person who shall invent a machine, than thirty acres, the silver medal, or twenty superior to any hitherto known or in use, to guincas. It is required that the land before answer the purpose of dibbling wheat, by which such improvement be absolutely uncultivated, the holes for receiving the grain may be made and iir a great mcasure useless, and that, in its at equal distances and proper depths; the sile improved statc, it be inclosed, cultivated, and ver medal, and ten guineas. The machine, divided into closes. Certificates of the num- with certificates that at least three acrés have ber of acres, of the quality of the land so im- been dibbled by it, to be produced to the Soproved, with a full account of every operation ciety on or before the second Tuesday in Jaand expense attending such improvement, the nuary, 1804. Simplicity and cheapness in sfare it is in as to the proportion of grass to the construction will be considered as princiarable, and the average-value thereof, to be pal parts of its merit. produced on or before the first Tuesday in Fe- 71. MACHINE FOR REAPING OR MOWING bruary, 1804.

CORN. For inventing a machine to answer 65. MANURES. For the most satisfactory the purpose of mowing or reaping wheat, rye, set of experiments, to ascertain the compara- barley, oats, or beans, by which it may be tive advantages of the following manures, used done more expeditiously and cheaper than by as top-dressings on grass or corn land, viz. soot, any method now piactised, provided it does coal.ashes, wood-ashes, lime, gypsum, nightnot shed the corn or pulse more than the mesoil, or any other fis article; the gold medal, thods in common practice, and that it lays the or the silver medal and twenty guineas. It is straw in such a manner that it may be casily required that the above experiments be made gathered up for binding; the gold medal, or between two or more of the above-mentioned thirty guineas. The machine, with certificates manures, and that not less than two acres of that at least three acres have been cut by it, land be dressed with each manure.

An ac

to be produced to the Sociсty on or before the count of the nature of the soil, quantity and second Tuesday in December, 1803. Simpliexpense of the manure and crops, with certific city and cheapness in the construction will be cales, to be produced on or before the last considered as principal parts of its merit. Tuesday in February, 1804.

72. TARASHING-MACHINE. To the per66. The same premium is extended one son who shall invent a machine by which corn year farther. The accounts and certificates to of all sorts may be thrashed more expeditiously, be produced on or before the last Tuesday in effectually, and at a less expense, than by any February, 1805.

method now in use; the gold medal, or thirty 67. RAISING WATER FOR THE IRRIGA- guineas. The machine, or a model, with proper TION OF LAND. To the person who shall certificates that such a machine has been usediscover to the Society the cheapest and most fully applied, that at least thirty quarters have effectual method of raising water in quantities been thrashed by it, and of the time employed sufficient to be beneficially employed for the in the operation, to be produced to the Society purpose of irrigating land, superior to and on or before the last Tuesday in February, 1804. cheaper than any other method now in use ; 73. DESTROYING THE GRUB OF THE the gold medal, or fifty guineas. A model on COCKCHAFER. To the person who shall disa scale of one inch to a foot, with certificates cover to the Society an effectual method, veri. that a machine at large on the same construc- fied by repeated and satisfactory trials, of detion has been used, specifying the quantity of stroying the grub of the cockchafer, or of prce water delivered in gallons per hour, and the venting or checking the destructive effects height to which it was raised, to be produced which always attend corn, peas, beans, and to the Society on or before the first of March, turnips, when attacked by those insects; the 1804.

gold medal, or thirty guineas. The accounts, 68. The same premium is extended one with proper certificates, to be produced on or year farther. Certificates to be produced on or before the first Tuesday in January, 1804. before the first of March, 1805.

774. DESTROYING WORMS. To the per69. PARING PLOUGH. To the person who son who shall discover to the Society an effec. shall invent and produce to the Society a ma• tual.method, verified by repeated and satisfacchine or plough for the purpose of paring land tory trials, of destroying worms, or of prevent. preparatory to burning, superior to any hitherto ing the destructive effects they occasion on

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corn, beans, peas, or other pulse ; the gold ou or before the first Tuesday in February, medal, or thirty guineas. The accounts, with 1804. proper certificales, to be produced to the So- 81. PREVENTING THE ILL EFFECTS OF ciety on or before the first Tuesday in Jan. FLIES ON SHEEP. To the person who shall 1804.

discover to the Society the most effectual me75. DESTROYING THE FLY ON Hops. thod of protecting sheep from being disturbed To the person who shall discover to the so- and injured by Aies; the silver medal, or ciety an easy and efficacious method of dc- twenty guineas. It is required that the method stroying the Ay on hops, superior to any hi- be ascertained by repeated experiments, and therto known or practised, on not less than that a certificate of its efficacy be delivered to four acres of hop ground, the gold medal, or the Society on or befure the ist Tuesday in thirty guineas. Accounts and certificates to be December, 1803. delivered to the Society on or before the first 82. PROTECTING SHEEP. To the person Tuesday in February, 1804.

who, in the year 1803, shall protect the great76. PREVENTING THE BLICHT, OR R 4- est number of sheep, not fewer than one hunVAGES OF INSECTS, ON FRUIT-TREES AND dred, by hovels, sheds, or any other means, CULINARY PLANTS. To the person who and give the most satisfactory account, veri. shall discover to the Society the most effec. fied by experiment, of the advantages arising tual method of preventing the blight, or ra- from the practice of protecting sheep from the vages of insects, on fruit trecs and culinary inclemency of the weather, by bovels, sheds, plants, superior to any hitherto known or or any other means; the silver medal, or twenty practised, and verified by actual and compa- guineas. A particular account of the experie rative experiments; the gold medal, or thirtyments made, with the advantages arising there. guineas. The accounts, with proper certificates, from, together with the expense, and certifto be delivered to the Society on or before the cates of its utility, to be produced to the sosecond Tuesday in November, 1803. ciety ou or before the first Tuesday in March,

77. The same premium is extended one 1804. year farther. The accounts and certificates to 83. The same premium is extended one be delivered on or before the second Tuesday ycar farther. The accounts and certificates to in November, 1804.

be delivered on or before the first Tuesday in 78. REMOVING THE ILL EFFECTS OF March, 1805. BLIGHTS, OR INSECTS. To the person who N. B. It is required that the certificates shall shall discover to the Society the most effectual specify the length of time the sheep were so method of removing the ill effects of blights, protected, and the manner in which they were or insects, on fruit-trees and culinary plants, maintained during that time; together with superior to any hitherto known or practised, the general method of managing them. and verified by actual and comparative expe- 84. IMPROVING THE CONDITION OF THE riments ; the gold medal, or thirty guincas. LABOURING POOR, BY ERECTING Cot. The accounts and certificates to be delivered to TAGES, AND APPORTIONING LAND. To the Society on or before the first Tuesday in the person who, in the year 1802, shall erect February, 1804.

the greatest number of cottages for the accom79. ČURE OF THE ROT IN SHEEP. To modation of the labouring poor, and apporthe person who shall discover to the Society tion not less than two acres of land to cach the best and most effectual method of curing cottage ; the gold medal. The accounts and the rot in sheep, verified by repeated and sa- certificates to be delivered to the Society of tisfactory experiments; the gold medal, or or before the first Tuesday in February, 1804. fifty guineas. It is expected that the candia 85. The same premium is extended one year dates furnish accurate accounts of the symp- farther. The accounts and certificates to be toms and cure of the disease, together with delivered to the Society on or before the first the impuled cause thereof, and the actual or Tuesday in February, 1805. probable means of prevention, which, with 86. IMPROVING THE CONDITION OF THE proper certificates, must be delivered to the LABOURING POOR BY APPORTIONING Society on or before the first Tuesday in Fe- LAND TO COTTAGES. To the person who, bruary, 1804.

in the year 1802, shall apportion to the great80. CURE OF THE FOOT-ROT IN SHEEP. est number of cottages already built upon his To the person who shall discover to the So- or her estate, any quantity of land, not less ciety the best and most effectual method of than two acres to each cottage, for the better curing the foot-rot in shcep; the gold medal, accommodation of the respective inhabitants; or thirty guineas.

the gold medal. The accounts of the number . It is required that the cure be ascertained of cottages, and of the quantity of land ap

by repeated and satisfactory experiments, and por to each, to be delivered to the So. the method of performing it he verified by ciety, with proper certificates, on or before the proper certificates delivered to the Society first Tuesday in February, 1804.

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