The Anatomy of Melancholy: What it is with All the Kinds, Causes, Symptoms, Prognostics, and Several Cures of it : in Three Partitions, with Their Several Sections, Members and Subsections Philosophically, Medicinally, Historically Opened and Cut Up

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Chatto & Windus, 1881 - 747 pages
 

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Page 494 - Corinth, met such a phantasm in the habit of a fair gentlewoman, which taking him by the hand, carried him home to her house, in the suburbs of Corinth, and told him she was a Phoenician, by birth, and if he would tarry with her, he should hear her sing and play, and drink such wine as never any drank, and no man should molest him ; but she, being fair and lovely, would live and die with him, that was fair and lovely to behold.
Page 296 - They went astray in the wilderness out of the way : and found no city to dwell in ; 5 Hungry and thirsty : their soul fainted in them.
Page 101 - Fernelius, by frequent meditation) is an inner sense, which doth more fully examine the species perceived by common sense, of things present or absent, and keeps them longer, recalling them to mind again, or making new of his own. In time of sleep, this faculty is free, and many times conceives strange, stupend, absurd shapes, as in sick men we commonly observe.
Page 12 - ... tis not my study or intent to compose neatly, which an orator requires, but to express myself readily and plainly as it happens. So that as a river runs sometimes precipitate and swift, then dull and slow ; now direct, then per ambages ; now deep, then shallow ; now muddy, then clear ; now broad, then narrow ; doth my style flow : now serious, then light ; now comical, then satirical ; now more elaborate, then remiss; as the present subject required, or as at that time I was affected.
Page 106 - ... sum, intelligible even to the meanest capacity; and that is, Do not that to another, which thou wouldest not have done to thyself...
Page 346 - Wherefore I perceive that there is nothing better, than that a man should rejoice in his own works; for that is his portion: for who shall bring him to see what shall be after him?
Page 535 - O Cupid, Prince of Gods and men." As carmen, boys and apprentices, when a new song is published with us, go singing that new tune still in the streets, they continually acted that tragical part of Perseus, and in every man's mouth was " O Cupid," in every street, " O Cupid," in every house almost, " O Cupid, Prince of Gods and men...
Page 349 - ... their names alone are the subject of whole volumes, we have thousands of authors of all sorts, many great libraries full well furnished, like so many dishes of meat, served out for several palates; and he is a very block that is affected with none of them.
Page 140 - Christians, yet more to be looked into than it is. For now by our too much facility in this kind, in giving way for all to marry that will, too much liberty and indulgence in tolerating all sorts, there is a vast confusion of hereditary diseases, no family secure, no man almost free from some grievous infirmity or other...

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