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CONDUCTED BY J. C. LOUDON, F.L.S. G.S. &c.
AUTHOR OF THE ENCYCLOPÆDIA OF COTTAGE, FARM, AND VILLA ARCHITECTURE

AND FURNITURE.

VOL. I.

LONDON:
LONGMAN, REES, ORME, BROWN, GREEN, & LONGMAN,

PATERNOSTER-ROW;

AND

WEALE, ARCHITECTURAL LIBRARY, HIGH HOLBORN.

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We have been induced to commence an Architectural Magazine, from the beneficial influence which, we are informed, has attended the publication of our Encyclopædia of Cottage, Farm, and Villa Architecture. One of the highest gratifications we have received, since we commenced author, is to know that that work is gradually effecting a reformation in the construction of cottage dwellings and farm buildings, not only throughout Britain and Ireland, but in America and Australia. The object of the Architectural Magazine is to second the effect produced by the Encyclopædia, by improving the public taste in architecture generally, by rendering it a more intellectual profession, by recommending it as a fit study for ladies, and by inducing young architects to read, write, and think, as well as to see and draw.

In this Volume will be found a series of papers by the Conductor, the object of which is to popularise the subject of architecture as a matter of taste; and there are also several able papers, written with the same view, by Mr. Trotman, and other professed architects. This we consider to be the first step towards rendering architecture a fit study for general readers, and especially for female ones. Our reasons for introducing such papers are grounded on the principle laid down by Alison in his Essays on Taste, viz. that - the most effectual method to check the empiricism either of art or science, is to multiply, as far as possible, the number of those who can observe and judge."

A second set of papers has for its object the familiarising of the general reader with what are technically called the Elements of Architectural Design. The first of these, on Classical Architecture, is by Mr. Trotman, a practical architect, well known for his eminent literary talents; and the subject has been completed by our architectural draughtsman, Mr. Robertson. Gothic Architecture, to which there has hitherto been no complete Introduction, either scientific or popular, has been kindly undertaken by Mr. Picton, at once an excellent practical architect and an able writer ; and this subject will be completed in the Second Volume.

The remaining papers are all of a practical nature, and either describe and criticise public or private buildings already executed, or furnish suggestions and designs for constructions in every department of the art, including finishing and furnishing; rural and garden architecture; and engineering, as far as is necessary to connect architecture with that science. The reader will find the various subjects treated on, both in the Original Communications and in the Reviews, systematically arranged in the Table of Contents.

In the Review Department we have given some account of the more important English, French, and German Works which have been published in the course of the year; and our Catalogue includes the titles, as far as we have been able to obtain them, of all the Architectural Works which have been published in Europe and America during the same period.

In the Miscellaneous Department will be found various opinions by different writers, and a variety of news, accompanied by criticisms, respecting architectural improvements going on in every part of the world, but more particularly in Britain.

For our forthcoming Numbers we have some valuable papers in hand; and we are kindly promised, by Mr. Lamb, a Series of Designs for Villas, in all the different varieties of the Gothic, Classical, and Italian styles.

In conclusion, we have to thank, most sincerely, those architects, both personal friends and strangers, who have kindly come forward to assist and patronise this infant periodical, the first of its kind that has been commenced in Britain : and we earnestly entreat all architects, and others connected with the building arts, who are desirous of advancing their profession; and our readers generally, who wish to promote the progress of architectural taste, and the universal diffusion of architectural comforts; to aid us,

Veir contributions and their advice; and, in short, by every assistance ir power. Bayswater, Nov. 20. 1834.

L.

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