Loudon's Architectural Magazine, Volume 1

Front Cover
John Claudius Loudon
Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, Green, and Longman, 1834
 

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Page 327 - That man is little to be envied, whose patriotism would not gain force upon the plain of Marathon, or whose piety would not grow • warmer among the ruins of lona.
Page 385 - For, on that principle, the wedge-like snout of a swine, with its tough cartilage at the end, the little sunk eyes, and the whole make of the head, so well adapted to its offices of digging and rooting, would be extremely beautiful.
Page 86 - MATHEMATICS FOR PRACTICAL MEN: Being a Common-Place Book of Principles, Theorems, Rules, and Tables, in various departments of Pure and Mixed Mathematics, with their Applications ; especially to the pursuits of Surveyors, Architects, Mechanics, and Civil Engineers, with numerous Engravings.
Page 267 - RAZ. — ESSAY ON THE ARCHITECTURE OF THE HINDUS. By Ram Raz, Native Judge and Magistrate of Bangalore, Corr.
Page 318 - ... there is hardly a county in England, Wales, or Scotland, in which they may not be pointed out. The Menai and Conway bridges, the Caledonian Canal, the St.
Page 349 - For no man can bear to be entirely deprived of such enjoyments: it is only because they are not used to taste of what is excellent, that the generality of people take delight in silly and insipid things, provided they be new. For this reason...
Page 81 - Views and descriptions of Cyclopian or Pelasgic remains in Greece and Italy, with constructions of a later period, from drawings by the late Edward Dodwell Esq. Intended as a Supplement to his classical and topographical tour in Greece during the years 1801, 1805 and 1806.
Page 349 - Men are so inclined to content themselves with what is commonest ; the spirit and the senses so easily grow dead to the impressions of the beautiful and perfect, that every one should study, by all methods, to nourish in his mind the faculty of feeling these things.
Page 307 - It is vain for painters or poets to endeavour to invent without materials on which the mind may work, and from which invention must originate. Nothing can come of nothing.
Page 307 - But no man can be a true critic or connoisseur who does not possess a universality of mind, who does not possess the flexibility, which, throwing aside all personal predilections and blind habits, enables him to transport himself into the peculiarities of other ages and nations, to feel them as it were from their proper central point; and, what ennobles human nature, to recognize and respect whatever is beautiful and grand under those external modifications which are necessary to their existence,...

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