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FLOWER PAINTING

IN

WATER COLOURS.

F. EDWARD HULME, F.L.S., F.S. A.

AUTHOR OF

FAMILIAR WILD FLOWERS,” “SUGGESTIONS IN FLORAL DESIGN,'

PRINCIPLES OF ORNAMENTAL ART,” ETC.

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OXFORD

EDUCATIONAL AND OTHER WORKS

BY THE SAME AUTHOR.

Familiar Wild Flowers. First, Second, and Third Series. 12s. 6d. each.

Each Series contains Forty ILLUSTRATIONS, with accompanying Descriptions of the Common
Wild Plants of the Stream, the Hedge-row, the Meadows, and the Forest.

Familiar Garden Flowers. First and Second Series. Cloth gilt, 12s.6d, each.

With Descriptive Text by SHIRLEY HIBBERD, and Forty full-page Coloured Plates from
Original Paintings by F. E. HULME, F.L.S., F.S.A., in each Series.

Suggestions in Floral Design. Price 52s. 6d.

Giving over Two HUNDRED Ornamental Applications in Gold and Colours of the Use C
Natural Forms for the purposes of Design.

[All the above are published by Messrs. CASSELL & COMPANY, Limited.]

Mathematical Drawing Instruments, and How to Use Them. Price 3s. 6d.

A Practical Treatise on the nature of the Commoner Instruments, giving full instructions as to their Use, and other Hints for the Young Mechanic, Art Student, or Draughtsman.

[Published by Messrs. TRUBNER. The Marlborough Freehand Drawing Course, Price 2s. A Series of Examples for the Use of Schools, and for Private Practice.

[Messrs. Seeley, Jackson, & HALLIDAY. The Town, College, and Neighbourhood of Marlborough. Illustrated. Price 6s.

Giving accounts of the Roman and Ancient British Remains; the great Druid Temple of Avebury; Camps and Burial Mounds; Mediæval and Modern Marlborough; the History of the College from its Foundation; the Forest of Savernake, &c. &c.

[Published by STANFORD.

FLOWER PAINTING IN WATER COLOURS.

SECOND

SERIES.

OUR

UR first series seems to have so far met a want that a demand for a second series

has arisen ; but while we are naturally gratified that our endeavours to produce a practical book should have been so far successful, those very endeavours have left us but little that remains unsaid. Our first set of directions was so far complete that they should have fairly equipped the would-be flower-painter for his or her pleasant task and labour of love; and we may therefore consider this second series rather as the result of a desire for more examples to work from than the evidence of a necessity for more instruction. In the introduction to the first part we dwelt on the desirability of students regarding our book merely as the means to an end, and that end-an aim ever to be kept in view—the ultimate representation of these beautiful forms from Nature itself. This advice we would desire emphatically to reiterate. The difficulties are much greater, for the natural flower is subject to change, and has a provoking way of either expanding soon after we have drawn it, or of drooping and falling to pieces long before we have done with it; but, on the other hand, the satisfaction of being able to reproduce for oneself those forms of natural loveliness that excite our admiration is infinitely greater than anything the mere copyist of another man's work can know. Such copying as the present examples will furnish will no doubt be helpful to beginners, but they must stretch their ambitions and imaginations to a point beyond.

Almost every man has his pet arrangement of colours, and we find one artist of experience using one series, while another, equally an adept, has quite another, and while one man says he does not know how he could possibly get on without such and such a colour, another says that he has never used it at all. It has occurred to us that, as all these illustrations were painted by ourselves in the first place from Nature and by means of one box of colours, it might be helpful to the beginner, at all events, if we were to set down its contents for his or her benefit. As we, however, use our colours for general sketching purposes as well, our list will be found to contain some colours no doubt that we have not at all mentioned as used in our flower-painting. The blues are four in number—Prussian blue, indigo, cobalt, and French ultramarine ; the first two being most useful to the flowerpainter in the preparation of greens and greys, while the other two either stand alone or make, in combination with other colours, rich and pure purples. The yellows are yellow ochre, gamboge, Indian yellow, and cadmium ; the first of these is of no very great service

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