The Natural Productions of Burmah: Or, Notes on the Fauna, Flora, and Minerals of the Tenasserim Provinces and the Burman Empire

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American Mission Press, T.S. Ranney, 1850 - 712 pages

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Page 231 - During the night the man on the lower branch was awakened by what he thought to be a tiger, but it was probably a leopard, creeping up the body of the tree above him. It had passed his branch, and was climbing up to where the other man slept. He called out : the man answered, and the leopard was still : not a claw moved. But the sleeping man could...
Page 48 - In proceeding down the river, I visited these spots, and found at each that a valuable bed of manganese ore existed close to the surface of the country. It had been apparently cut through by the action of the streams and river before mentioned, leaving a section of the bed of ore in their banks covered only by the debris of the banks themselves. Large quantities might have been carried away, but a few hand specimens only were taken, which sufficiently shew the nature of the deposit, and are fair...
Page 95 - is the most charming of all the plants of this natural order that I have met with, the great length of time it continues to throw out a profusion of large, beautiful, fragrant blossoms, makes it particularly desirable.
Page 477 - It is famous for the fish that are there." Malte Brun, on the authority of Marco Polo, says : " The country of Caride is the southeast point of Thibet, and perhaps the country of the nation of the Canaines, which is spread over Ava ;" and Teen a word signifying heaven, but used by some of the Chinese to signify God, occurs in Karen poetry as the name of the God of a people with whom they were formerly connected. The Karen language also indicates a connection with tribes on the borders of Thibet....
Page 287 - C. fuciuhaga; and this particular species occurs abundantly on parts of the coast of the Malayan Peninsula, in the Nicobar Islands, and the Mergui Archipelago, and so high as on certain rocky islets off the southern portion of the coast of Arracan, where the nests are annually gathered and exported to China.
Page 43 - Kahan itself is the highest portion of a low ridge of hills, not more than 200 feet above the level of the river ; it is composed of a soft, friable, white sandstone rock, the upper portions of which are decomposed and irregular. The surface gravel does not contain tin. It is found in the crystallized form, interspersed in decomposed granite, forming a vein about three feet wide, which is enclosed by the white sandstone rock, and dips down at a high angle with the horizon. Specimen No. 10, if its...
Page 49 - Tenasserim river has passed through the manganese bed in one spot 2 miles removed from two other points at which it occurs to the north and south, at both of which it is likewise discovered near the surface by the action of the streams Thuggoo and Therabuen, the probability therefore is, that it is an horizontal deposit, covering many square miles. But without indulging in conjecture, there is sufficient at the localities referred to, to indicate large quantities of manganese ore, which could be...
Page 345 - Specimens of this serpent in my possession changed the skin every third or fourth month, a process which takes place in all the Indian serpents several times during the year. The Hamadryas is very fierce, and is always ready not only to attack, but to pursue, when opposed : while the Cophias, the Vipera, the Naja, and the Bungarus, merely defend themselves ; which done, they always retreat, provided no further provocation is offered. The natives of India assert that individuals are found upwards...

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