Athenian Letters, Or, The Epistolary Correspondence of an Agent of the King of Persia, Residing at Athens During the Peloponnesian War: Containing the History of the Times, in Dispatches to the Ministers of State at the Persian Court ; Besides Letters on Various Subjects Between Him and His Friends, Volume 1

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John Archer, 1792 - 525 pages
 

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Page xlv - Athenian Letters, or the Epistolary Correspondence of an Agent of the King of Persia, residing at Athens during the Peloponnesian War.
Page 221 - He used to thank the gods for three things ; that he was born a reasonable creature, and not a beast ; a man, and not a woman ; a Greek, and not a Barbarian.
Page 128 - ... dead. After some time he came abroad, and pretended that the intelligence which his friends gave him in his retreat, of the transactions of Crotona, was collected during his stay in the other world among the shades of the departed. He formed his disciples, who came from all parts to put themselves under his direction, into a kind of republic, where none were admitted till a severe probation had sufficiently exercised their patience and docility. He afterwards divided them into esoteric and exoteric...
Page 129 - Pherecydes and Thales in the other; following, in this particular, the patterns set him by the Egyptian priests, his instructors, who were not less celebrated for settling the civil than the religious economy of their nation. In imitation of them, Pythagoras gave laws to the republic of Crotona, and brought the inhabitants from a state of luxury and dissoluteness, to be eminent for order and sobriety. While he lived, he was frequently consulted by the neighbouring republics, as the composer of their...
Page xiv - The work was supposed to be genuine, and a translation from an old Arabic version ; but when a due interval of time has elapsed the truth may be owned ; the illusion vanishes ; it is a masquerade which is closed ; the fancy dresses and the dominos are returned to the respective wardrobes; the company walk about again in their proper habits, and return to their proper occupations in life."* A copy of this edition having been transmitted by the younger brother of Charles Yorke, created Lord Dover,...
Page 10 - The firft queftion you would probably have me refolve, is, what peculiar difference I find in the manners of Greece and Perfia...
Page 128 - ... his travels through the east, conversing with the Magi and Indian Brachmans, and mixing their doctrines with those he had learnt in Egypt. He afterwards studied the laws of Minos at crete, and those of Lycurgus at Sparta. Having spent the earlier part of his life in this useful manner, he returned to Samos well acquainted with every thing curious either in nature or art in foreign countries, improved with all the advantages proceeding from a regular and laborious course of learned education,...
Page 129 - ... and imagined that between God and man there were various orders of spiritual beings, who administered to the divine will. He believed in the doctrine of the metempsychosis, or transmigration of souls; and held that God was diffused through all parts of the universe, like a kind of universal soul, pervading every particle of matter, and animating every living creature, from the most contemptible reptile to mankind themselves, who shared a larger portion of the Divine spirit. The metempsychosis...
Page 33 - In imitation therefore of these men and placing happiness in liberty and liberty in valour, be forward to encounter the dangers of war. For the miserable and desperate men are not they that have the most reason to be prodigal of their lives, but rather...
Page 189 - ... important occurrences. I am satisfied, that man is not born for himself only, but for the service of others, . and that there is a law, which directs all to the practice of what is just, and good, and true, planted in every man's breast ; that human laws only inforce this, and bind it upon bad men ; that the good are not influenced by them, and he that attends has no need of any other obligation than what av'scs trom hence.

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